Approved Activity Registry

Instructions

Interprofessional education is a powerful tool that can be used to establish linkages between the education system and the health care delivery system. Through IPE engagement opportunities, students learn to collaborate and communicate effectively, and, by doing so, they develop leadership qualities and mutual respect for one another’s knowledge and skill sets. The following IPE learning activities have been approved by the TTUHSC Office of Interprofessional Education. Each approved IPE Learning activity has met the criteria of involvement of two or more professions; significant interactivity between participants; opportunities to learn about, from, and with one another; and interprofessional teaching/learning that is intentionally targeted, discussed, addressed, and/or assessed. Through successful participation in a registered IPE learning activity, TTUHSC learners will be eligible to earn credit to satisfy institutional IPE graduation requirements.

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Office of Interprofessional Education
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47 activities

Title

Fostering an Organizational Culture of Teamwork: An Interprofessional Didactic Project

Description
Organizational characteristics, such as organizational culture, are important aspects for interprofessional teamwork, quality of care, and patient outcomes. Studies have demonstrated that interprofessional teamwork is influenced by organizational culture. Further studies have shown that teamwork predicts job satisfaction. In fact, organizational culture is often considered as the precondition of teamwork in the healthcare setting. Several studies have shown the effects of interprofessional teamwork on outcome criteria on the patient/family, employee/staff, and organization domains. On the patient/family domain, high quality teamwork is linked with higher patient satisfaction ratings and compliance, improved quality of treatment, improved patient safety and better clinical outcomes. On the employee/staff domain, high quality teamwork is linked to higher job satisfaction, greater well-being, improved mental health, better team climate, and increased team efficiency. On the organization level, high quality teamwork is associated with cost savings, higher workforce retention, and reduced employee turnover. The aim of this interprofessional didactic activity is to target concepts of organizational characteristics, including teamwork, employee motivation, and employee retention, which lead to improved patient, employee, and organizational outcomes. The activity will be a course assignment within one of the Master of Science in Healthcare Administration (MSHA) core courses, HPHA 5307: Human Resources Management. The Master of Science in Healthcare Administration is a fully online graduate healthcare administration degree geared towards working healthcare professionals who are seeking to obtain the skills and knowledge necessary to advance as a successful healthcare leader. Because the MSHA program is for working healthcare professionals, students are from a wide variety of clinical backgrounds. A student cohort will typically include the following professions: healthcare administration, nurses, physicians, physician assistants, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, medical technologists, radiology technologists, speech therapists, emergency medical professionals, and others. During this didactic activity, students will be divided into interprofessional groups of six or seven, with various professions represented in each group. The activity will consist of the group responding to a scenario-based case study concerning employee motivation and turnover in a hospital setting. The group will interact as a committee formed to discuss this issue for each of their respective professions, as well as for the group and organization as a whole. The group will prepare a report discussing this issue, how it relates to each of their professions, and the formulation and implementation of a strategy or strategies to address the issue. The students in each group will communicate via discussion forums. Each group member will be provided Interprofessional team strategies to help them to have a better understanding of how to effectively work in a collaborative team environment. There will be a high level of interactivity among group members within the forum. The group paper will discuss each of the professions and will be a learning activity that they work on and complete together. Another aspect of the assignment requires each student to summarize what they learned through this project, what they learned about the other professions represented, and also what they learned about working in collaboration with an interprofessional team. The learning objectives for this activity and assignment are that at the end of the assignment, students will be able to: • Discuss the importance of employee motivation and empowerment • Describe the challenges faced by various health professions in regard to employee motivation and turnover • Discuss the importance and benefits of working in an Interprofessional collaborative group
Date Approved
2/23/2018
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Title

Embracing Cultural Diversity and Individual Differences: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
Numerous studies have shown that when organizations provide an opportunity that fosters collaboration and interprofessional education, then team cohesiveness improves. What has not been widely explored is the impact of those same exercises and their potential influence on gender, ethnic, cultural, religious, or intra-personal professional perceptions. The purpose of the interprofessional (IP) and diversity simulation is to immerse interprofessional teams of students in “a day in the life” of a healthcare professional working on a medical-surgical floor or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Students from TTUHSC nursing and pharmacy as well as social work, occupational therapy, and speech therapy students from Abilene Christian University collaborate to deliver high quality and safe patient-centered care as members of an interprofessional team. The simulation design includes 22 evidence-based scenarios ranging in acuity level from "walk-in" clinic diagnoses such as hypertension to med-surg diagnoses such as breast cancer. The simulation scenarios focus on cultural issues and diversity of the patients. First and second semester junior nursing students are assigned to work together in teams and are allocated to either the med-surg floor or the FQHC to collaborate with other professions on all aspects of patient care. Standardized patients and high-fidelity manikins depict the roles of patients and family members. A structured, one-hour debrief session follows the simulation. Huddles and debriefs are also provided throughout the scenarios, as needed. During huddle and debrief sessions, interprofessional education discussion topics include values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, teamwork, and interprofessional communication tools. Feedback and survey: Prior to and following the event, students complete a feedback sheet and complete an interprofessional education survey related to interprofessional practice and education. Objectives: 1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of health care professionals participating in a community engagement event. 2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional event.
Date Approved
2/8/2018
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Title

Medication Safety: A Didactic Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
Medication errors are the second most prevalent cause of adverse patient incidents in health care settings. As such, medication safety is a global concern and interprofessional education is vital for preparing students, including nursing students, for their roles in the collaborative care team. Knowing about and valuing the skills and responsibilities of other team members and respecting each person’s unique contribution to the work of the team can lead to more effective communication and collaboration in the context of medication safety. The purpose of this interprofessional interview project is for nursing students to become familiar with other members of a patient's health care team, including pharmacists, and discover the current application of interprofessional teams in health care. Through an interprofessional interview with a pharmacist, Non-Traditional BSN students will better understand their professional roles and the roles of others around the central theme of medication safety and prevention of medication errors. Students in the RN to BSN Program and Accelerated BSN Program (Second Degree and Veteran BSN (VBSN) tracks) are asked to interview a pharmacist in their community. The nursing student develops a set of content questions, as well as questions about role’s/responsibilities and team communication strategies around the central focus of medication safety, prevention of medication errors, and communication methods to encourage reporting of medication errors. The questions are used as a guide for the interview. Students are then asked to reflect upon the answers provided to them during the interview process and write a one-page interview reflection paper. Sample questions may include: 1. What other disciplines does the pharmacist interact with on a daily basis, i.e. physician, nurse, social worker, medical assistant, etc.? 2. How does the pharmacist interact with the other discipline(s)? Include no less than two examples. 3. What common medication errors are seen in the pharmacy? 4. What is the process for reporting a medication error? 5. What strategies are in place to prevent medication errors? 6. What kind of education is provided to clients regarding new medications? Learning objectives for this interprofessional interview project include: 1. Reporting the collective and individual responsibilities in the prevention of medication errors. 2. Identify the importance of information (written and verbal) and communication with other professionals in the prevention and reporting of medication errors. 3. Recognize that teamwork and collaborative care are essential skills in medication safety and prevention of mediation errors.
Date Approved
1/29/2018
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Title

Utilizing Teamwork During Code 99 Management: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
During this series of IPE simulations, participants are trained to recognize signs and symptoms of chest pain progressing to coded 99 status. The IPE simulations allow participants to apply standardized teamwork strategies and communication tools to a patient care situation in order to optimize patient safety and outcome. Faculty assist students in selecting appropriate teamwork strategies and communication tools, as well as facilitate the interprofessional student team debrief following the simulation. Specific learning objectives for this IPE simulation are as follows: 1. Recognize sign and symptoms of chest pain. 2. Identify and initiate best practices for code 99 status. 3. Apply appropriate standardized teamwork strategies to an interprofessional healthcare team. 4. Practice effective team communication. 5. Participate in facilitated debriefing to optimize the IPE learning experience.
Date Approved
1/24/2018
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Title

Integrative Medicine Symposium: A Set of Interprofessional Workshops

Description
The TTUHSC Integrative Medicine Symposium highlights healing-oriented medicine that takes account of the whole person, including all aspects of patient care. It emphasizes the therapeutic relationship between practitioner and patient, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapies. The afternoon of the symposium features a set of interprofessional workshops on various integrative medicine topics. Each presented workshop has been designed to give students across each health profession a better understanding of the professional roles and responsibilities of each presented modality. Empirical exposure and personal interactions across all health profession disciplines has proven to be important in building effective interdisciplinary teams. Students will be placed into interprofessional teams according to their workshop preferences and will participate with their team during the workshop learning activities and facilitator guided debrief. Workshops include: Acupuncture for Abdominal/Pelvic Pain Better Health with Reflexology Cupping Therapy: The history, origin, and interdisciplinary health benefits the therapy brings Dry Needling in Physical Therapy Introduction to Reiki Therapy Express Yourself: Integrating Creative Arts Experiences into the Healthcare Setting Performing Arts Methodologies in Practice: Healing Through Mindfulness & Action The Healing Power of Therapy Dogs Tools and Application of Yoga Therapy as CAM Collective Learning Objectives of the Workshops: 1. Understand the history, theory, and evidence-base of integrative medicine modalities on mind-body wellness. 2. Experience integrative medicine modalities and provide examples of shared patient populations that may benefit from various integrative medicine modalities. 3. Discuss as an interprofessional team the benefits of integrative medicine modalities and how these can be incorporated into team-based care.
Date Approved
1/23/2018
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Title

Alive & Aware - Health Explosion: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Event

Description
Interprofessional collaborative care is a strategic component of many community engagement activities. Community engagement provides the opportunity for interprofessional learning, as interprofessional teams of students work side-by-side to respond to challenges faced by communities. Interprofessional community engagement activities provide students with knowledge about the community (including assets within the community), as well as allows students to develop trusting collaborative care relationships, value difference and diversity, be flexible, and foster a long-term commitment to staying engaged in the community. Interprofessional community engagement learning experiences also have the potential to increase students’ comfort in developing relationships with patients and families from different cultures and who have different lifestyles and socialization. Alive and Aware: Health Explosion is a community event to recognize National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day. During this interprofessional community engagement activity, interprofessional teams of students will health screenings, patient/family counseling, and health education. The City of Amarillo Public Health HIV Prevention Team is partnering with the Amarillo College, Texas Tech University Health Science Center, West Texas A&M University, and St. John Baptist Church Health Sciences Committee to bring this free and open event to the public. Free HIV, Syphilis, and Hepatitis C testing along with screenings for BMI, blood pressure, blood glucose, blood cholesterol, and COPD will be available. Patient education on tobacco cessation, diabetes, medication safety, and exercise will also be provided. The screenings will be available for both adults and children. Adult immunizations will also be offered for $5. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.: FREE Health Screenings 11 a.m.: FREE Lunch 11:30 am to 1 p.m.: Education Sessions: Diabetes and Me Operation Breathe (Tobacco Prevention and Cessation – free resources in Amarillo) Love & Health (Resources in the Community) This interprofessional community engagement event is structured as follows: 1. Interprofessional pre-event huddle: During the huddle, students will go over team assignments, roles and responsibilities, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics related to patient population. Students will then work together to prepare their screening booth and plan with their team. 2. Interprofessional community engagement event: Interprofessional teams of students will be stationed in various booths for one of three purposes including 1) health screenings, 2) patient/family counseling, or 1) patient/family education. Interprofessional student teams will administer a wide range of health screenings, counsel patients/families on the results of the screenings and give recommendations and information about additional resources, and provide health education related to prevention and safety. 3. Feedback and survey: Following the event, student complete a feedback sheet and complete an interprofessional education survey of 5 questions related to interprofessional practice and education. Objectives: 1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of health care professionals participating in a community engagement event. 2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional community engagement event.
Date Approved
1/19/2018
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Title

Designing Collaborative Care Facilities: An Interprofessional Didactic Project

Description
Student engagement involving multiple professions is a key element in the future of designing healthcare facilities that will support collaborative care. One of the most important service delivery models — collaborative care — is highlighted in the Institute for Medicine's list of 20 national priorities for improving healthcare. Collaborative care, however, has not been widely practiced in the healthcare industry except at university-affiliated teaching hospitals and medical centers. This interprofessional small group didactic project will allow students the opportunity to design the deliberate organization of patient care activities between two or more professions involved in a patient's care, including the patient, to facilitate the appropriate delivery of healthcare services. Organizing care and designing spaces with the intention of collaborative care is a way to accelerate cultural change, instill student excitement, and facilitate "buy-in" on the most appropriate facility design that will support collaborative care. Despite all of the challenges of designing a collaborative care environment, the collaborative approach is a transparent process that enables a variety of professions to speak a parallel language focusing on facility design and oversight in healthcare excellence. Developing a new healthcare facility, using an approach like collaborative care design, requires knowledge of roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, and team communication strategies. By working together, students from different professions can develop well-thought-out goals, objectives and metrics, freely sharing knowledge and real-life lessons and experiences, the result will be a beneficial healthcare environment where a collaborative care team delivers consistent, positive outcomes in patient care. As part of a business management course, Master's of Occupational Therapy and Doctor of Physical Therapy students will work together in small teams of 6-8 students to design a collaborative care practice. Students will be responsible for developing a Facility Plan, Organizational Plan, Financial Plan and a Marketing Plan for a new collaborative care practice that features, but is not limited to, the professions of occupational therapy and physical therapy. In addition to collaborative care healthcare design, students will have to use core IPE competencies of teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and team communication to work as an interprofessional team to design the new healthcare facility.
Date Approved
1/5/2018
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Title

Integration of Counseling to the Healthcare Community: A Didactic Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
The practice of professional counseling is collaborative and interprofessional at the core. Most counselors interact with allied service systems including healthcare professionals, educators, human service providers, and members of the criminal justice community on a regular basis. Much of this interaction is repeated within a small network of practitioners who have already developed strategic relationships between the agencies they represent. While individual relationships develop, the groundwork is often in place and practitioners struggle when having to develop strategic alliances with non-traditional partners. Since this interprofessional learning opportunity is designed to occur as students begin their initial foray into professional practice settings, the opportunity will task them with developing a relationship with a member of another profession that would represent the potential to develop a non-traditional partnership for the population the individual hopes to serve. This IPE learning activity will be a course assignment within the Practicum course for each of the three counseling programs: Clinical Mental Health Counseling (HPMC5314); Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling (HPCR5314) and Addictions Counseling (HPAC5314). Each of these programs is a fully on-line graduate training program to prepare fully licensable clinicians for practice in specialty counseling fields. As independent practitioners graduates will interact with a variety of allied professional fields in service to their clients. During this experiential learning activity students will work with their clinical instructor to identify an allied professional field that may be of service to the population of clients the student desires to serve. Having identified a need, the student will be supported in making initial contacts within the field to arrange an interview for the purpose of ascertaining how they may be able to work together to serve clients in the future. To facilitate this process the students will develop an outline of the information they desire to learn, develop a list of interview questions that must include questions on roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, interprofessional communication, and values/ethics for collaborative practice. The students will then interview the professional and develop a reflective paper and ‘resource report’ to share with their peers regarding their learning experience. In the interview reflection, the students must report responses to interview questions and provide strategies to address improved collaboration and teamwork with the profession selected. IPE learning objectives for this project include: Values and Ethics for Interprofessional Practice 1. Review and compare the ethical practice standards for the student’s counseling specialty and the chosen profession. Roles and Responsibilities 1. Explain the roles and responsibilities of other service providers and how the team works together to meet the client’s needs; 2. Forge interdependent relationships with other professions to improve care and advance learning. 3. Use the full scope of knowledge, skills, and abilities of available service providers to provide services that a safe, timely, efficient, effective and equitable. Interprofessional Communication 1. Choose effective communication tools and techniques, including information systems and communication technologies, to facilitate discussions and interactions that enhance team function. Team and Teamwork 1. Develops a teamwork approach to facilitate improved customer care.
Date Approved
1/4/2018
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Title

The 8-hour SIM Day: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
A key component of today’s healthcare education is interprofessional education simulations. Interprofessional education (IPE) simulations can help to clarify roles and responsibilities of team members, increase students’ interprofessional communication skills, allow students to practice functioning as a team, and instill the values/ethics of collaborative care. These types of IPE simulations allow students to work on unfolding cases where a patient’s condition changes and progresses over time. These real-life immersion experiences allow students to interact with other health professions by communicating patient needs, providing patient updates, interpreting lab results, and communicating and directing patient-centered care. All students in healthcare-related professions should know how to appropriately and successfully communicate with other health professions, as well as have the skills to function as a successful members of the healthcare team. To this end, the TTUHSC School of Nursing developed a hospital-based IPE simulation for the TTUHSC BSN Traditional Undergraduate (TUG) Program on the Lubbock, Abilene, and Odessa campuses. The “8-hour SIM Day” is an IPE simulation that allows nursing students to prioritize patient centered collaborative care, adhere to a simulated nursing schedule, utilize critical thinking to make decisions, function as an interprofessional team member, clarify roles and responsibilities of the team, and communicate effectively with interprofessional team members. At the beginning of the IPE simulation, each nursing student is paired with a standardized patient for whom they will provide coordinated care across the 8 hours duration of the simulation. The composition of the student’s healthcare team for their specific standardized patient varies campus-to-campus based on the availability of professions on each campus. The interprofessional team on the Lubbock campus includes nursing students, medical students, and graduate speech-language pathology students. On the Abilene campus, the team includes TTUHSC nursing students, Abilene Christian University (ACU) graduate occupational therapy students, and ACU graduate speech-language pathology student. On the Odessa campus, the interprofessional team includes nursing and graduate physician assistant students. Throughout the simulation, students practice interprofessional communication and teamwork skills to improve quality and safe patient-centered care, as well as patient satisfaction with care. After the simulation, a debriefing session is completed and is a requirement for nursing students. Interprofessional team members are encouraged to attend as schedules allow. Students discuss the simulation based on completeness, efficiency, and effectiveness of collaborative care. Students reflect on the roles and responsibilities of each team member, use of standard interprofessional communication tools, and success of the team to deliver quality care.
Date Approved
1/4/2018
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Title

TeamSTEPPS® 2.0 Fundamentals Course: An Interprofessional Training

Description
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Department of Defense (DoD) have developed TeamSTEPPS, a teamwork system that offers a powerful solution to improving collaboration and communication within institutions. Teamwork has been found to be one of the key initiatives within patient safety that can transform the culture within health care. Patient safety experts agree that communication and other teamwork skills are essential to the delivery of quality health care and to preventing and mitigating medical errors and patient injury and harm. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based program aimed at optimizing performance among teams of health care professionals, enabling them to respond quickly and effectively to whatever situations arise. This curriculum was developed by a panel of experts, incorporating more than 25 years of scientific research that has been conducted on teams and team performance. TeamSTEPPS is a highly interactive interprofessional experience designed to enhance team dynamics with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety and outcomes. Fundamental Modules of TeamSTEPPS include: Team Structure Communication Leading Teams Situational Monitoring Mutual Support Implementation and putting it all together Students participating in TeamSTEPPS 2.0 Fundamental training will gain knowledge and skills to: 1. describe the impact of medical error and the importance of communication and teamwork in error prevention. 2. recognize barriers to effective teamwork and identifying team structure to include the role of the patient. 3. describe how communication affects team processes and outcomes identifying skills of SBAR, call-out, check-back, and handoff. 4. describe the tools for leading teams, including briefs, huddles, and debriefs. 5. understand how a shared mental model affects team effectiveness. 6. describe how mutual support affects team processes and outcomes and identify skills of feedback, assertiveness, 2-challenge rule, and CUS.
Date Approved
1/4/2018
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Title

Reflections on a Interprofessional Mini-Series: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
Interprofessional practice and education (IPE) is an important step in advancing health professional education and has been widely endorsed as a mechanism to improve the overall quality of health care. During this interprofessional small group activity, interprofessional teams of students will view one or more episodes from an interprofessional mini-series and then participate in a guided reflection of some aspect of collaborative practice. During the required small group reflection, students will have an opportunity to actively engage with other students in their small group. In some cases, pre- and post-tests will be provided to assess student engagement and learning after viewing episodes and participating in the guided reflections. Currently, two interprofessional mini-series have been developed at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center. Each interprofessional mini-series promotes leadership and professional development in the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) “core” competency domains including (1) roles and responsibilities, (2) interprofessional communication, (3) values/ethics, and (4) teams and teamwork. The interprofessional mini-series serves to provide an IPE learning platform for students in preparation for collaborative care experiences on clinical rotation. The interprofessional mini-series includes high definition videos arranged in 12 individual learning episodes, as well as a single feature film. The 12 episodes depict both ideal and dramatized interprofessional and student/preceptor interactions, followed by educational commentary. Each episode is designed to include entertainment, student/preceptor scenarios, student/preceptor expert commentary, and student/preceptor learning pearls. 1. The Reason I Jump: An Interprofessional Mini-Series: This interprofessional mini-series includes the professions of occupational therapy, nursing, medicine, pharmacy, athletic training, emergency medical services, and speech-language pathology. The trailer for The Reason I Jump: An Interprofessional Mini-Series can be viewed at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdAUqjjzRLM. 2. Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series: This interprofessional mini-series includes the professions of nursing, pharmacy, medicine, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology. The trailer for Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1i79XDQHB4.
Date Approved
1/4/2018
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Title

Introduction of TeamSTEPPS Tools into Physical Therapy Practice Settings: An Interprofessional Service Learning Project

Description
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Department of Defense (DoD) have developed TeamSTEPPS, a teamwork system that offers a powerful solution to improving collaboration and communication within institutions. Teamwork has been found to be one of the key initiatives within patient safety that can transform the culture within health care. Patient safety experts agree that communication and other teamwork skills are essential to the delivery of quality health care and to preventing and mitigating medical errors and patient injury and harm. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based program aimed at optimizing performance among teams of health care professionals, enabling them to respond quickly and effectively to whatever situations arise. The aim of this service learning project is to have students in the transitional doctor of physical therapy (tDPT) program, introduce a TeamSTEPPS strategy or tool into their current interprofessional practice environment and reflect on the success of the implementation on team performance. The tDPT program is a post-professional online/distance education program. Students are licensed physical therapists and work as clinicians; therefore, the students’ current interprofessional work environment will be utilized within the context of this service learning activity. Although the mix of professions varies practice-site to practice-site, physical therapists typically work in teams with physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, occupational therapists, speech-language pathologists, athletic trainers, audiologists, exercise physiologists, and dietitians. The objectives of this IPE learning activity are to: explain the role of TeamSTEPPS, discuss TeamSTEPPS strategies and tools, introduce TeamSTEPPS strategies and tools within an interprofessional community practice environment, and to show continued desire to utilize these tools. These objectives are accomplished through three components associated with this learning activity. 1. Lecture: Course content introducing TeamSTEPPS and TeamSTEPPS strategies and tools. Lecture content and additional resources are provided in the weekly module. 2. Initial reflection: Students are asked reflect on, and write about, a series of questions centered around identifying the interprofessional team they work with most often, current methods of communications, and strengths, weaknesses and barriers of the team related to communication and collaboration. 3. Service Learning Implementation: Identification of a TeamSTEPPS strategy that the student feels would be useful within their interprofessional team. They are asked to educate their team on this strategy and implement use of the tool or strategy over a 2 week period. 4. Final reflection: Students complete the written assignment by reflecting on a series of questions centered around their thoughts and attitudes regarding the implementation process, including teaching the team, adapting to the new style of communication, and success of this change. This assignment is part of HPPT 8361 Professional Development which is offered in the Spring and Fall semesters and has varied enrollment of 8-25 students.
Date Approved
1/3/2018
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Title

Speech-Language Pathology/Occupational Therapy Co-Treatment: An Interprofessional Collaborative Care Experience

Description
A collaborative care approach between speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs) is a highly effective treatment strategy. Due to the integration of sensory and motor abilities into the development of speech, language, cognitive, and swallowing skills, a natural connection between OTs and SLPs exists. Additionally, both have a common foundation of practice and students from each profession are trained in anatomy, physiology, neurology, illnesses/disease processes, and medical management of disorders. OT practice often prioritizes self-care, work, play, psychosocial function, motor skills, sensory integration, and related functional issues that impact participation in daily activities. SLPs prioritize functions of communication, cognitive ability, oral motor skills, and swallowing ability that allow individuals to participate in daily activities. The purpose of this interprofessional collaborative care experience is to encourage OT and SLP students to explore common ground, work collaboratively with each other to develop a patient/family centered plan of care and to execute a course of treatment. A collaborative session between disciplines, or co-treatment, allows students from both professions to use their professional skills to address complimentary components of skill development. Successful collaboration allows the patient to also generalize the skills taught within the therapy session into their home, classroom, or daily life. During this collaborative care experience SLP/OT pairs will work together in the TTUHSC Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic to deliver group or individual therapy to children and adults with a variety of speech, language, cognitive, sensory, and/or swallowing impairments. Co-treatment with an OT and SLP student during the regular semesters (fall and spring) is typically 1-3x per week for 12-13 weeks. Co-Treatment in the summer semester typically takes the form of intensive summer therapy programs with daily treatment for 1-2 weeks. Through this type of collaborative care experience, the patient’s outcomes are more easily reached, and skills typically carryover/generalize more quickly so length of treatment is much shorter. This collaborative care experiential learning experience also allows students to gain excitement and enthusiasm about using common underlying principles to enhance treatment outcomes. Principles of IPE and collaborative care are address in the following ways: • Role clarification • Collaborative treatment planning • Continuity of care • Shared vocabulary • Complementary targets • Behavior management strategies • Communication with parents/caregivers
Date Approved
1/2/2018
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Title

¡Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes!: An Interprofessional Patient Education Program

Description
"Si, Yo Puedo Controlar Mi Diabetes" is a seven-week diabetes self-management program led by an AmeriCorps VISTA Coordinator, in conjunction with the West Central Texas Council of Governments (Big County AHEC). ¡Sí, Yo Puedo Controlar Mí Diabetes! (Sí, Yo Puedo) is an evidence-informed, culturally competent educational program targeting low-literate Hispanic/Latinos with diabetes. The curriculum is predicated on the American Diabetes Association’s national standards of care, and employs the social cognitive and self-regulation theories as its foundational support. Empowerment is an overarching theme of the program, and, to this end, Sí, Yo Puedo aims to equip participants with knowledge and lifestyle skills to better control their diabetes. This interprofessional program significantly enhances participants’ engagement in diabetes self-care behaviors, improvements in self-confidence about diabetes self-care, and increases diabetes knowledge. Topic Sessions for the program include: Week 1: ¿Qué es la diabetes? (What is diabetes?) Week 2: Revisando sus niveles de glucosa en la sangre (Checking your blood glucose levels) Week 3: Comiendo de manera saludable condiabetes (Eating healthy with diabetes) Week 4: Mantengase activo con diabetes (Be active with diabetes) Week 5: Los medicamentos y la diabetes (Medicines and diabetes) Week 6: Prevención de los problemas relacionados con la diabetes (Preventing diabetes problems) Pharmacy students from TTUHSC and nutrition students from Abilene Christian University will be partnered to provide patient education on two topic sessions. Students must work together to present patient education, solicit and answer patient questions, lead hands-on learning activities, and encourage patient empowerment throughout the educational program. Throughout each 1.5-2 hr patient education session, students are encouraged to ask questions of each other and engage in collaborative patient-centered education. Student must also work together to deliver a diabetes self-management education program in a culturally meaningful and relevant manner, which is more likely to yield positive health outcomes. The first session, "Checking your Blood Glucose Levels," will include a discussion on high and low carbohydrate foods, a "mini-lecture" on how to check a blood glucose level, a demonstration of using a glucose meter, and assisting patients in the process of checking their blood glucose level. The second session, "Medicines and Diabetes," will include a "mini-lecture" about medications and common myths surrounding diabetes medications, problem-solving scenarios, and a discussion of the Healthy Plate Method. Ten patient participants have registered for the course, and 5-7 pharmacy students will be present for each session. A pharmacy faculty preceptor will be present during both sessions. In preparation for the event, students will have attended two training sessions, led by the faculty preceptor, to better understand the material they will be presenting, brainstorm potential questions the patient participants might ask, discuss common barriers to self-management of diabetes, and discuss the role of team-based diabetes education in the ambulatory care setting. Following the collaborative patient education sessions, pharmacy students will also complete a reflection survey to evaluate the impact the IPE learning activity had on their perceptions of collaborative care in diabetes management. Objectives: 1. Understand the role of a pharmacist in team-based diabetes education. 2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional self-management program for Latino patients with type 2 diabetes.
Date Approved
1/2/2018
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Title

Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS): An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
Millions of Americans, many of whom are children, live in poverty every day. Many more have incomes above the poverty line, but their incomes are still low enough to qualify for programs like Food Stamps and Medicaid. The aim of this interprofessional poverty simulation is to build empathy for patients with financial insecurities, as well as to teach students about disparities in health and living conditions within a community. The Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS) originated in Missouri with the Missouri Association for Community Action. The interprofessional poverty simulation includes interprofessional teams of students who are divided into pre-determined families with the goal of making it through a month of working and paying bills while facing the challenges of a low income family. Pre-determined families have various financial scenarios that range from having low-income jobs to living off social security. Student teams have to figure out how to use the money in their scenario to support their simulation families with the provided services within the simulation. Each simulation also includes multiple university and community volunteers who act as service providers such as daycare workers, employment office personnel, pawnshop workers, schoolteachers, and healthcare workers. The simulation is divided into four fifteen minute segments – each representing a week of the month. As the simulation progresses, the students were challenged to collaborate among themselves and work with available institutions and resources to provide food, water, shelter and miscellaneous expenses for a one-month period. Students must also collaborate and work with agencies and organizations including public schools and work environments, utility and mortgage companies, pawn and quick loan agencies, grocery stores, pharmacies, health care facilities, as well as social service agencies. At the end of the simulation, students break into small interprofessional groups led by trained debriefers to discuss their experience of living the life of a low-income family. The CAPS provides realistic situations and creates opportunities for students to experience the stress, emotions, physical and financial distress that people experience every day when engaging with the healthcare system.
Date Approved
1/1/2018
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Title

Healthcare Administration Capstone: An Interprofessional Didactic Project

Description
The Healthcare Administration Capstone course (HPHA 5314) is the final course in the Master of Science in Healthcare Administration (MSHA) program. The intent of the course is for students to combine knowledge that they have gained from the program, along with research conducted through literature reviews and potentially interprofessional interviews, to propose team-based recommendations and solutions related to a healthcare issue or problem. Students that choose to incorporate an interprofessional and collaborative care theme into their capstone project, are able to count the capstone as an IPE learning activity. Interprofessional education would be targeted in the healthcare administration capstone project in the following ways: 1. Students would identify a healthcare issue or problem and complete a literature review. 2. The student would conduct structured interviews with at least 3 different healthcare professionals to ask about experience with the healthcare issue, as well as inquire about interprofessional and team-based solutions. 3. In the capstone paper, the student must research and identify how collaborative care and team-based solutions could greatly impact the healthcare issue.
Date Approved
12/18/2017
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Title

Introduction to Collaborative Team-Based Care: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
Interprofessional simulation learning activities have become one of the major pillars of healthcare education, as it allows for experiential learning in a safe and supportive environment. This enables interprofessional teams of students to practice skills without risk to patients. Students can practice various teamwork or collaborative care tasks including procedural and complex cognitive skills in a simulated setting. By re-creating clinical events in a simulated environment, interprofessional teams of students from a range of fields can experience working together in a way that will allow them to reflect on collaborative practice. The aim of this interprofessional simulation is to introduce teamwork and team-based care concepts including: 1) knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to teamwork 2) appreciation of other professionals, their patient care roles, and skills 3) awareness regarding the effective use of resources 4) communication and collaboration 5) self-confidence as it relates to teamwork 6) clinical reasoning The following is an overview of this simulation activity: 1) 180 entering first year medical students (MS1) are divided into small teams of 30, each of which has designated time slots in the simulation center. 2) Small interprofessional groups of five students each spend 30 minutes at 3 different stations that highlight the myriad of learning activities provided by the TTUHSC simulation center. One of these stations highlights Interprofessional Collaborative Care in that six interprofessional teams of students at each station enhance their levels of competency in IPE teamwork, communication, incorporation of the roles/responsibilities of various healthcare professions other than their own to enhance patient care in an environment of respect and collaboration. 3) Interprofessional Simulation: Small groups will then observe and participate in an interprofessional team simulation with standardized patients. Students composing the interprofessional teams represent the professions of: nursing, medicine, audiology, occupational therapy, pharmacy, graduate school of biomedical sciences and speech-language pathology. Each small group is assigned 1 or 2 cases that highlight the role of each of the professions listed above in a patient discharge scenario. The standardized patient is also a student. Objectives of the Interprofessional Stations: 1. The student will describe roles and responsibilities of each healthcare professional on the healthcare team. 2. List the characteristics of the team members (both individual and group) that enhanced patient care and safety. Objectives of this interprofessional simulation include: 1. The student will describe the roles and responsibilities of each healthcare professional on the healthcare team. 2. The student will demonstrate communication skills through role-playing in a simulated ambulatory care outpatient clinic with a standardized patient. 3. The student will be able to discuss how role-playing in a simulated environment can lead to the development and understanding of the importance of teamwork in enhancing patient treatment and safety.
Date Approved
11/16/2017
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Title

Team Assessment of Vestibular and Balance Disorders: An Interprofessional Simulation with Standardized Patients

Description
Interprofessional simulations using standardized patients (SP) are widely used to train team-based care to interprofessional teams of students. SPs are individuals who are recruited and trained to consistently portray the clinical presentation (signs and symptoms) of a specific illness or disease state, in this case a vestibular dysfunction. The use of SPs provides interprofessional student teams with highly realistic learning opportunities for them to refine their patient interaction, clinical assessment, clinical decision-making, team communication, collaborative practice skills, and overall patient care skills. During this interprofessional simulation, interprofessional teams of students will function as members of an Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Balance Care team (ICPBC team) composed of physicians (MS2), physical therapists (PT), audiologists (AUD), and physician assistants (PA) (not all interprofessional student teams had all professions represented). Activity Outline: 1. Prior to the team evaluation with the SP, the interprofessional student teams meet for a huddle to introduce and pre-brief how they will assess the standardized patient (SP). 2. Each team then has up to 50 minutes with the SP to determine vestibular function, make a differential diagnosis, develop a collaborative plan of care and provide patient education and recommendations. 3. Student teams then complete a 5+ assessment of how they performed as an ICPBC team with emphasis on IPE competencies. 4. Student teams then participate in a simulation debrief session with a faculty facilitator. Student teams present and discuss their findings and compare the differential diagnosis for each case. The facilitated debrief also includes a discussion of how the students performed as a team and what feedback they received by the SP. Resources: All students except PA had received didactic lectures on vestibular and balance disorders. However, PA students were in the clinical training of their curriculum and will graduate in the spring of the next year. All documents are posted on SAKAI. Objectives: 1. Students training for a career in audiology (audiologist in training) or training for a career as a physician assistant (physician assistant in training) or training for a career as a physician (physician in training) or training for a career in physical therapy (physical therapist in training) will identify roles and responsibilities for each healthcare professional on the balance care team by performing as an Interprofessional Collaborative Team in a simulated setting. 2. Students from the health care professions described in objective 1, will work together as an Intercollaborative Practice Team to deferentially diagnose common dizziness and balance disorders with evidence-based practice techniques in a clinical setting with a standardized patient (SP). 3. Post SP examination, students from the health care professions described in objective 1, will debrief as an interprofessional team to discuss the diagnosis, long term management plan, and secondary referral options for their patient (SP). Completion of these objectives will solidify the concept that Interprofessional Collaborative Practice enhances patient care, safety and satisfaction.
Date Approved
11/15/2017
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