Approved Activity Registry

Instructions

Interprofessional education is a powerful tool that can be used to establish linkages between the education system and the health care delivery system. Through IPE engagement opportunities, students learn to collaborate and communicate effectively, and, by doing so, they develop leadership qualities and mutual respect for one another’s knowledge and skill sets. The following IPE learning activities have been approved by the TTUHSC Office of Interprofessional Education. Each approved IPE Learning activity has met the criteria of involvement of two or more professions; significant interactivity between participants; opportunities to learn about, from, and with one another; and interprofessional teaching/learning that is intentionally targeted, discussed, addressed, and/or assessed. Through successful participation in a registered IPE learning activity, TTUHSC learners will be eligible to earn credit to satisfy institutional IPE graduation requirements.

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Office of Interprofessional Education
email iconipe@ttuhsc.edu
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47 activities

Title

Introduction to Collaborative Team-Based Care: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
Interprofessional simulation learning activities have become one of the major pillars of healthcare education, as it allows for experiential learning in a safe and supportive environment. This enables interprofessional teams of students to practice skills without risk to patients. Students can practice various teamwork or collaborative care tasks including procedural and complex cognitive skills in a simulated setting. By re-creating clinical events in a simulated environment, interprofessional teams of students from a range of fields can experience working together in a way that will allow them to reflect on collaborative practice. The aim of this interprofessional simulation is to introduce teamwork and team-based care concepts including: 1) knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to teamwork 2) appreciation of other professionals, their patient care roles, and skills 3) awareness regarding the effective use of resources 4) communication and collaboration 5) self-confidence as it relates to teamwork 6) clinical reasoning The following is an overview of this simulation activity: 1) 180 entering first year medical students (MS1) are divided into small teams of 30, each of which has designated time slots in the simulation center. 2) Small interprofessional groups of five students each spend 30 minutes at 3 different stations that highlight the myriad of learning activities provided by the TTUHSC simulation center. One of these stations highlights Interprofessional Collaborative Care in that six interprofessional teams of students at each station enhance their levels of competency in IPE teamwork, communication, incorporation of the roles/responsibilities of various healthcare professions other than their own to enhance patient care in an environment of respect and collaboration. 3) Interprofessional Simulation: Small groups will then observe and participate in an interprofessional team simulation with standardized patients. Students composing the interprofessional teams represent the professions of: nursing, medicine, audiology, occupational therapy, pharmacy, graduate school of biomedical sciences and speech-language pathology. Each small group is assigned 1 or 2 cases that highlight the role of each of the professions listed above in a patient discharge scenario. The standardized patient is also a student. Objectives of the Interprofessional Stations: 1. The student will describe roles and responsibilities of each healthcare professional on the healthcare team. 2. List the characteristics of the team members (both individual and group) that enhanced patient care and safety. Objectives of this interprofessional simulation include: 1. The student will describe the roles and responsibilities of each healthcare professional on the healthcare team. 2. The student will demonstrate communication skills through role-playing in a simulated ambulatory care outpatient clinic with a standardized patient. 3. The student will be able to discuss how role-playing in a simulated environment can lead to the development and understanding of the importance of teamwork in enhancing patient treatment and safety.
Date Approved
11/16/2017
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Title

Team Assessment of Vestibular and Balance Disorders: An Interprofessional Simulation with Standardized Patients

Description
Interprofessional simulations using standardized patients (SP) are widely used to train team-based care to interprofessional teams of students. SPs are individuals who are recruited and trained to consistently portray the clinical presentation (signs and symptoms) of a specific illness or disease state, in this case a vestibular dysfunction. The use of SPs provides interprofessional student teams with highly realistic learning opportunities for them to refine their patient interaction, clinical assessment, clinical decision-making, team communication, collaborative practice skills, and overall patient care skills. During this interprofessional simulation, interprofessional teams of students will function as members of an Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Balance Care team (ICPBC team) composed of physicians (MS2), physical therapists (PT), audiologists (AUD), and physician assistants (PA) (not all interprofessional student teams had all professions represented). Activity Outline: 1. Prior to the team evaluation with the SP, the interprofessional student teams meet for a huddle to introduce and pre-brief how they will assess the standardized patient (SP). 2. Each team then has up to 50 minutes with the SP to determine vestibular function, make a differential diagnosis, develop a collaborative plan of care and provide patient education and recommendations. 3. Student teams then complete a 5+ assessment of how they performed as an ICPBC team with emphasis on IPE competencies. 4. Student teams then participate in a simulation debrief session with a faculty facilitator. Student teams present and discuss their findings and compare the differential diagnosis for each case. The facilitated debrief also includes a discussion of how the students performed as a team and what feedback they received by the SP. Resources: All students except PA had received didactic lectures on vestibular and balance disorders. However, PA students were in the clinical training of their curriculum and will graduate in the spring of the next year. All documents are posted on SAKAI. Objectives: 1. Students training for a career in audiology (audiologist in training) or training for a career as a physician assistant (physician assistant in training) or training for a career as a physician (physician in training) or training for a career in physical therapy (physical therapist in training) will identify roles and responsibilities for each healthcare professional on the balance care team by performing as an Interprofessional Collaborative Team in a simulated setting. 2. Students from the health care professions described in objective 1, will work together as an Intercollaborative Practice Team to deferentially diagnose common dizziness and balance disorders with evidence-based practice techniques in a clinical setting with a standardized patient (SP). 3. Post SP examination, students from the health care professions described in objective 1, will debrief as an interprofessional team to discuss the diagnosis, long term management plan, and secondary referral options for their patient (SP). Completion of these objectives will solidify the concept that Interprofessional Collaborative Practice enhances patient care, safety and satisfaction.
Date Approved
11/15/2017
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Title

The Tuesday Clinic: An Interprofessional Student-Run Free Clinic

Description
The Tuesday Clinic is a weekly student-run free clinic at Union Gospel Mission-Calvert Place Men’s Shelter, which is staffed by volunteer students from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School and the TTUHSC School of Pharmacy. In addition to the student-run free clinic, there is also a Class D Pharmacy where patients can receive over-the-counter and prescription medications. Students from different professions, including pharmacy medicine, pre-med, nursing, and PA, collaborate to provide care for the underserved population. By working together, students can use their strengths from each of their professions to educate each other and enhance patient care outcomes. The Tuesday Clinic serves to: 1. Provide high quality, free medical care to the underserved population of North Dallas regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, or ability to pay. 2. Provide an interprofessional learning environment for teams of students, thereby allowing them to develop clinical, organizational, and leadership skills. 3. Instill in students a lifelong commitment of service to the community and others in need. 4. Introduce students to the needs of the uninsured. IPE objectives for this experience include: - Interprofessional teams of students will interview patients together obtaining subjective and objective information - Teams will then discuss a potential assessment and plan together - Teams will then present the patient to the team of interprofessional preceptors, including pharmacist and physician assistant - The interprofessional team will develop a plan with the patient - Students will write a SOAP note of patient encounters in a electronic medical record TTUHSC pharmacy students wanting to receive IPE credit, will write a 1-2 page IPE reflection and/or provide a team-based discussion on IPE, how each role contributed to patient care, what each profession learned from another profession, and what other professions would be able to contribute.
Date Approved
11/14/2017
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Title

Interprofessional Professionalism in Healthcare: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
Healthcare involves many personal interactions with a variety of people. Interprofessional professionalism in healthcare is more than just good manners; it is about establishing respectable relationships with patients, team members, and managers. Interprofessional professionalism (IPP) is defined as consistent demonstration of core values evidenced by professionals working together, aspiring to and wisely applying principles of, altruism and caring, excellence, ethics, respect, communication, and accountability to achieve optimal health and wellness in individuals and communities. (Stern DT. Measuring Medical Professionalism. Oxford University Press. New York, NY; 2006:19.) In a healthcare setting, healthcare professionals must set the tone for the interaction with patients, families, and other members of the healthcare team. Additionally, health professionals are constantly in contact with people who will assess them based on the way they communicate, body language, and appearance. Interprofessional professionalism, when practiced by all health professions: enhances quality healthcare outcomes for patients, promotes a culture that value and foster individual competence, and improves practice and academic environments. The purpose of this IPE learning activity is to focus on the observable behaviors that illustrate what interprofessional professionalism looks like in the context of interprofessional collaborations focused on patient- and family-centered care. Key IPP concepts will include understanding one’s own profession, understanding professional boundaries, evidence of respect towards other professions and valuing their contribution, understanding legal and ethical requirements of professions in team, reflection and critically appraisal and evaluation of outcomes of practice. During an interprofessional etiquette dinner hosted by the TTUHSC School of Health Professions, IPP will be addressed by a guest speaker, interprofessional networking, small group discussions with IPP topics facilitated by a faculty preceptor, and student development and presentation of elevator speeches. Students will be divided into interprofessional small groups and assigned a table and preceptor. Following a presentation on IPP, students will partake of a three-course etiquette dinner. Throughout the dinner, the preceptor will facilitate small group discussions from a list of predetermined IPP topics. Students will then have the opportunity to develop and deliver an “elevator speech.” The interprofessional small group and faculty will comment on the delivery and the content, as well as provide suggestions for improving interprofessional communication style. IPP learning outcomes for this IPE Learning activity include: COMMUNICATION Demonstrates active listening with members of other health professions. Communicates respectfully with members of other health professions. Communicates with members of other health professions in a way they can understand, without using profession-specific jargon. Responds to questions posed by members of other health professions in a manner that meets the needs of the requester. RESPECT Demonstrates confidence, without arrogance, while working with members of other health professions. Recognizes that other health professions may have their distinct cultures and values, and shows respect for these. Respects the contributions and expertise of members of other health professions. Seeks to understand the roles and responsibilities of members of other health professions as related to care. Determines patient care roles and responsibilities in a respectful manner with members of other health professions. ALTRUISM AND CARING Offers to help members of other health professions when caring for patients. Demonstrates empathy for members of other health professions. Models for other health professionals compassion towards patients/clients, families and caregivers. Places patient/client needs above own needs and those of other health professionals. EXCELLENCE Coordinates with other health professions and the patient/client, family and caregivers to produce an optimal plan of care. Reviews all relevant documentation from other health care professions prior to making recommendations to plan of care. Contributes to decisions about patient care regardless of hierarchy/profession-based boundaries. Works with members of other health professions to assure continuity of care for patients. ETHICS Interacts with members of other health professions in an honest and trustworthy manner. Works collaboratively with members of other health professions to resolve conflicts that arise in the context of caring for patients/clients. Discusses with members of other health professions any ethical implications of healthcare decisions. Reports or addresses unprofessional and unethical behaviors when working with members of other health professions. ACCOUNTABILITY Engages with members of other health professions in quality assurance/improvement activities. Seeks clarification from members of other health professions about unclear information. Accepts consequences for his or her actions without redirecting blame to members of other health professions. Works with members of other health professions to identify and address errors and potential errors in the delivery of care.
Date Approved
11/10/2017
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Title

International Programs for Students: An Immersive Interprofessional Global Health Educational Experience

Description
Immersive global health education, in the form of the TTUHSC international programs for students, brings together students from diverse professions to examine challenges facing the global society. With these interprofessional perspectives, teams of students develop innovative ideas that advance collaborative care practices locally and internationally. Students who participate in these global health learning experiences gain cultural humility and global health awareness, as well as learn to collaborate and foster interprofessional interconnectedness. Immersive global health education provides opportunities for students to collaborate with other students from different health care backgrounds, engage with diverse opinions, and solve problems by incorporating multiple perspectives. By participating in international team-based care, students become more confident in their professional and team identities. It also encourages students to value other health professions, and better prepares students for collaborative patient-centered care. Across all TTUHSC international program sites, immersive interprofessional global health education requires knowledge of community cultures and values/ethics, along with respect for the knowledge and experiences of community members and community health workers. Immersive global health education affords students opportunities to understand the larger structural forces underlying social issues, provides transformational interprofessional learning experiences, and and help students see the world, and the practice of their profession, in a different way. TTUHSC international program sites include Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Peru. Interprofessional education is targeted through team-building, team communication, values and ethics, roles and responsibilities, and collaborative team-based care. Goals and Objectives: TTUHSC students will become more globally competent and better able to meet the health care needs of all people as a result of expanding their understanding of the cultural influences on health care. 1. Participation in this international experience will foster attitudes of: volunteerism, humanitarianism, concern for underserved populations, interprofessional teamwork, and appreciation for public health careers. 2. Participation in this international experience will increase awareness of: social determinants that impact health, global interdependence, the impact of culture on health, communication difficulty across language and cultural barriers, health care delivery systems in resource poor settings, personal motivation for career choice, the need for community advocates and by working towards a common goal enhance participants understanding of health professional roles and how each profession contributes to the provision of care for patients in these different cultural settings. 3. Participation in this international experience will develop skills for: collecting history and conducting physical examination, communication not only across cultures but also across health professions, communicating in a foreign language, and diagnosing illness and injury with limited resources. TTUHSC offers two types of international programs for students: FACULTY-LED PROGRAMS: A TTUHSC faculty member designs the program in consultation with his/her school, recruits students for the program, accompanies the students abroad, administers the program, and is responsible for the educational content of the program. INSTITUTIONAL PROGRAMS AT APPROVED SITES There are three types of approved sites: 1. An institution with which TTUHSC has an agreement/memorandum of understanding (MOU) 2. International organizations with which the U.S. has representation (e.g., WHO, PAHO, UN) 3. Approved teaching hospitals, institutions, and health related organizations. This option allows students to participate in programs they select/arrange and which meet individual interests or passions.
Date Approved
11/8/2017
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Title

The Nurse Executive’s Role in Leading Improvement: An Interprofessional Didactic and Experiential Project

Description
Purpose: The purpose of the Interprofessional Education (IPE) activity is to provide an in situ clinical experience in which the graduate student in the nurse administration track enacts the role of a nurse executive and leads a team of interprofessional healthcare professionals (that includes at least one person from a from different profession i.e. physician, social worker, respiratory therapist, occupational therapist, physical therapist, pharmacist, etc...) in an improvement initiative (nurse administration project [NA Project]). Detailed Description: In a prerequisite course, NURS5348: Administrative Role Development: The Nurse Administrator as Leader, students work directly with faculty and a preceptor(s) to develop and implement the clinical experience. In preparation for leading change in an interprofessional environment, the students learn skills related to the nurse executive role as well as other profession’s leadership skills. The core competencies used to build leadership skills for nurses are the Nurse Manager and Nurse Executive Core Competencies developed by the American of Nurse Executives (AONE) and for the other professions, the Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA) Core Competency Directory is utilized. Students use the core competencies to measure the status of their leadership skills by reflecting on their clinical experience via a clinical log. During clinical, students spend time with leaders within the organization, mostly non-nurse leaders i.e. financial vice presidents, billing personnel, quality improvement directors, pharmacy as well as ancillary department leaders. This helps students attain skills by recognized clinical experts and facilitates interprofessional relationships needed to create sustainable change and provide safe high quality care in the clinical setting. A deliverable at the end of the didactic portion of this class is a written proposal of an improvement project, NA Project. Development of the proposal requires students to work with the preceptor as well as appropriate interprofessionals to identify and plan the project. The level of engagement of other interprofessionals will vary based on the NA Project and the clinical site but the very least includes the student interviewing non-nursing professionals to ensure multiple professional perspectives influence the improvement project. At the end of the course, students are required to have a NA Project that has been approved by either the site or TTUHSC’s QIRB or IRB and is ready to implement in the next class, NURS6010: Application of the Administrative Practice. During NURS6010, students continue clinicals at their chosen healthcare setting as described above. It is during this course that the students implement and evaluate their NA Projects. Since the nursing administration students spend three semesters at a selected facility, they are usually accepted as leaders and are often approved to engage a team of interprofessionals in their NA Project, a team they must lead from development of the project to evaluation. As part of the didactic of this course, students complete an IPE forum where they address and dialogue about their IPE clinical experiences. And at the end of the class, students are required to submit a completed clinical log (containing reflections of their clinical experiences), provide a class presentation regarding their overall clinical learning experiences as well as the results of their NA Project.
Date Approved
11/6/2017
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Title

Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia: An Interprofessional Problem-Based Learning Activity

Description
Interprofessional problem-based learning (PBL) is a widely used tool to collaboratively educate/train teams of students from a variety of health care professions. Interprofessional PBL is a student-centered teaching/learning method that uses problems relevant to desired learning outcomes as a means of encouraging self-directed learning, critical thinking, lifelong learning, team collaboration, interprofessional communication, and self-evolution among students. Interprofessional PBL requires student collaboration to develop strategies to resolve problems, consider alternative solutions, and justify their solution to others. The goal of this interprofessional PBL activity was for interprofessional teams of students to work collaboratively to solve for a differential diagnosis of aphasia in samples and cases of patients who present with acute onset of changes in functional communication. Interprofessional teams include 2nd year medical students (MS2), graduate occupational therapy students, and graduate speech-language pathology students. The interprofessional PBL activity has 2 components including a component on the anatomical and physiological foundations of aphasia, as well as a differential diagnosis component based on video and case presentations. Objectives for this interprofessional PBL activity include: 1. Expand teamwork skills essential for health care students to work collaboratively to solve problems. 2. Increase team communication skills during shared learning experiences. 3. Understand the roles and responsibilities of other health care professions in the care of patients with aphasia.
Date Approved
10/26/2017
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Title

Speech Associated Anatomy: An Interprofessional Gross Anatomy Lab

Description
Anatomy courses provide an ideal platform for interprofessional education learning opportunities. Gross anatomy and dissection activities enable students to work together through a shared experience of understanding anatomical and physiological concepts from different perspectives. The aim of this interprofessional gross anatomy lab is to increase interprofessional collaboration early in students’ healthcare education. This interprofessional head and neck gross anatomy lab focuses on the dissection of the pharynx, nasal cavity, pterygopalatine fossa,, and oral cavity. Interprofessional teams of students, which include first year medical students (MS1), first year graduate students enrolled in a Graduate Medical Sciences Program (GSBS), and graduate speech-language pathology students (SLP), will be assigned to each cadaver tank. During the lab, interprofessional student teams will work collaboratively to identify head and neck anatomy. For example, medical students identify structural elements to the SLP students. Together the interprofessional teams discuss the physiology of the structures, as well as deficits that occur if these structures are damaged including clinical signs and symptomatically of disease processes. The shared learning of anatomy is an innovative IPE learning activity for the two groups of students because both groups require profound knowledge of human anatomy and its role in the pathogenesis of disease IPE Objectives: During the collaborative gross anatomy training, the aim is to foster collaborative teamwork within an atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation. Students are encourage and cued to approached each other without bias and learn about, from and with each other. By working as an interprofessional collaborative team, students discuss roles and responsibility within in collaborative care teams.This will be accomplished by: 1) In an interactive laboratory setting: a) Medical students will enhance their knowledge of human anatomy by reviewing the anatomy of the head and neck with students training for a career in speech-language pathology. b) Medical and speech-language pathology students will discuss how embryological anomalies to the head and neck can lead to physical abnormalities resulting in speech disorders such as including cleft palate and cleft lip. 2) Through these two processes, students will: a) Expand their understanding of how medical and speech-language pathology students can learn from each other in a pre-clinical setting b) Strengthen interprofessional communication skills c) Apply the principles of team dynamics to enhance their knowledge of developmental anomalies that lead to speech disorders
Date Approved
10/26/2017
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Title

Anatomy and Physiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: An Interprofessional Small Group Discussion

Description
Research has established the effectiveness of interprofessional small group learning in health professions education as an active learning strategy that can enhance student collaboration, improve interprofessional communication skills, and facilitate deep processing of information. This interprofessional small group discussion centers around clinically oriented anatomy and physiology of cleft lip and palate. This IPE learning activity is integrated into a TTUHSC School of Medicine (SOM) course entitled "Patients, Physicians and Populations (P3)" that incorporates didactic material contained in the 8 blocks of the SOM Year 1 and 2 curriculum. This specific P3 event includes didactic material form the Clinically Oriented anatomy MS1 block. Outline of activity: 1. This session will allow first year (MS1) medical students, undergraduate students from the speech, language, and hearing sciences program, graduate students from the speech-language pathology program, and graduate students from the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences to work collaboratively in small groups to describe and assess two topics pertinent to the anatomy of the head and neck: cleft palate and the vocal cords (also called vocal folds). Interprofessional teams of students are provided with resource reading materials prior to the small group discussion. 2. MS1 students are covering the anatomy of the head and neck in the Clinically Oriented Anatomy (COA) course, including the general areas below: • Bones, muscles, arteries, nerves and lymph nodes of the neck • Development of the nose, jaws and palate • Embryological clinical considerations • The larynx and vocal cords and their function in speech and respiration 3. This small group session has 2 main content areas: 1) Coping with Cleft Palate/ Cleft Lip, 2) Thyroplasty for Phonic Tics: An Ethical Case. 4. IPE is targeted during team formation and during small group discussions. IPE concepts targeted during this IPE activity include interprofessional communication, roles and responsibilities, and teamwork/collaborative care. 5. Students will have completed an online interprofessional education assessment prior to the session; they will be prompted to complete a post-test afterward. Objectives: • Identify interprofessional roles and responsibilities in dealing with patients and families affected by speech disorders • Describe embryological anomalies to the head and neck, including cleft palate and cleft lip • Identify key issues related to the diagnosis, treatment and long-term follow up for cleft palate and cleft lip • Analyze a recent case involving vocal cord surgery and discuss its clinical and ethical challenges related to collaborative team-based care
Date Approved
10/26/2017
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Title

Amarillo Heart Walk: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Event

Description
Community engagement provides the opportunity for interprofessional learning, as interprofessional teams of students work side-by-side to respond to challenges faced by communities. Interprofessional community engagement activities provide students with knowledge about the community (including assets within the community), as well as allows students to develop trusting collaborative care relationships, value difference and diversity, be flexible, and foster a long-term commitment to staying engaged in the community. Interprofessional community engagement learning experiences also have the potential to increase students’ comfort in developing relationships with patients and families from different cultures and who have different lifestyles and socialization. Amarillo Heart Walk is a community event to recognize the American Heart Walk, the American Heart Association's premier event for raising funds to save lives from this country's number 1 and number 5 killers - heart disease and stroke. During this interprofessional community engagement activity, there will be two interprofessional student teams-pharmacy students and graduate students. Pharmacy students will offer health screenings, patient/family counseling, and health education. Free screenings on BMI, blood pressure, blood glucose, and blood cholesterol will be available. Patient education on exercise, disease managements (e.g., stroke, heart disease, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension) will also be provided. The screenings will be available for both adults and children. Graduate students will participate in this event to promote legislative advocacy for patients and to raise funds and awareness of heart disease and stroke in our community. Several labs in Amarillo campus are conducting research in cardiovascular disease and stroke. During this event, the pharmacy students will have an opportunity to interact with the graduate students to learn the innovative on-going research in the field of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Also, Ph.D. faculty and Pharm.D. faculty will participate and available for supervision of students. 6:30 am to 9:30 am: FREE Health Screenings 9:30 am to 10:30 am: 5K Heart Walk 10:30 am to 11:30 am: Wrap up the event This interprofessional community engagement event is structured as follows: 1. Interprofessional pre-event huddle: During the huddle, students will go over team assignments, roles and responsibilities, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics related to patient population. Students will then work together to prepare their screening booth and plan with their team. 2. Interprofessional community engagement event: Pharmacy and graduate students will be stationed in various booths for one of three purposes including 1) health screenings, 2) patient/family counseling, and 3) patient/family education. Interprofessional student teams will administer a wide range of health screenings, counsel patients/families on the results of the screenings and give recommendations and information about additional resources, and provide health education related to prevention and safety. 3. Feedback and survey: Following the event, student complete a feedback sheet and complete an interprofessional education survey of 5 questions related to interprofessional practice and education. Objectives: 1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of health care professionals participating in a community engagement event. 2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional community engagement event.
Date Approved
10/14/2017
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Title

Dia de la Mujer: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Event

Description
Interprofessional collaborative care is a strategic component of many community engagement activities. Community engagement provides the opportunity for interprofessional learning, as interprofessional teams of students work side-by-side to respond to challenges faced by communities. Interprofessional community engagement activities provide students with knowledge about the community (including assets within the community), as well as allows students to develop trusting collaborative care relationships, value difference and diversity, be flexible, and foster a long-term commitment to staying engaged in the community. Interprofessional community engagement learning experiences also have the potential to increase students’ comfort in developing relationships with patients and families from different cultures and who have different lifestyles and socialization. This program addresses the specific health concerns of Hispanic women and their families by educating them about their health, well-being and personal safety in a culturally sensitive environment including Hispanic speakers and health care professionals. Dia de la Mujer is presented in Spanish, and includes a knowledgeable keynote speaker, informative educational sessions, and numerous essential health screenings. Vital information on important health topics such as mental wellness, sleep debt, fitness/exercise, hormones, self appreciation and a wealth of other important wellness information will be available. This will be the 8th year that TTUHSC SOP will be in charge of all of the health screenings. This will be the 4th year as an Interprofessional event between TT SON, SOM, PT, AC SON, WT SON. This interprofessional community engagement event is structured as follows: 1. Interprofessional pre-event huddle: During the huddle, students will go over team assignments, roles and responsibilities, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics related to patient population. Students will then work together to prepare their screening booth and plan with their team. 2. Interprofessional community engagement event: Interprofessional teams of students will be stationed in various booths for one of three purposes including 1) health screenings, 2) patient/family counseling, or 1) patient/family education. Interprofessional student teams will administer a wide range of health screenings, counsel patients/families on the results of the screenings and give recommendations and information about additional resources, and provide health education related to prevention and safety. 3. Feedback and survey: Following the event, student complete a feedback sheet and complete an interprofessional education survey of 5 questions related to interprofessional practice and education. Objectives: 1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of health care professionals participating in a community engagement event. 2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional community engagement event.
Date Approved
10/14/2017
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Title

Annual IPE Fall Symposium: An Interprofessional Case-Based Learning Activity

Description
As the transition to team-based care grows within the practice environment, health professions students must learn to work effectively in teams to optimize the outcomes of the care they will ultimately provide to patients, families, and communities. The Annual IPE Fall Sympsosium is the annual IPE day for TTUHSC across all campuses. Hosted by the Office of Interprofessional Education, the event features a morning keynote speaker that highlights interprofessional practice and education and an afternoon interprofessional case-based learning activity for students. The keynote speaker will target IPE concepts through sharing professional or personal experiences, which exemplifies the connection between team-based care and improved patient outcomes.The afternoon case-based learning activity serves as the registered IPE learning activity. This portion of the IPE Fall Symposium is used as a forum to discuss teamwork, interprofessional communication tools, roles/responsibilities, and values/ethics of patient-centered care. During the case-based learning activity, interprofessional teams of students develop a collaborate plan of care for a mock patient and/or family. The objectives of this IPE Learning Activity include: 1. Develop collaborative practice skills and enhance health care knowledge by assessing, explaining, discussing, systematic reasoning, and applying interprofessional knowledge in the context of clinical case presentations for integrated learning and better long-term recall. 2. Develop and practice the four interprofessional core competencies of roles and responsibilities of health professions, teamwork, interprofessional communication, and values/ethics that will prepare our students to establish and maintain professional relationships with patients, families, and health care team members. 3. Develop the skills of critical thinking, research, evaluation (self & others), teaching, giving and receiving feedback, exploration, and collaboration/teamwork.
Date Approved
10/8/2017
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Title

Trauma Management: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
The purpose of the interprofessional (IP) trauma simulation is to immerse interprofessional teams of students in “a day in the life” of a healthcare professional working in a trauma center. Students from TTUHSC nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant, and public health programs along with firefighter/EMT/paramedic, respiratory therapy, and social work students within the community collaborate to deliver high quality and safe patient-centered care as members of an interprofessional team. The simulation design includes 25 evidence-based scenarios ranging in acuity level from "walk-in" clinic diagnoses, such as otitis media, to high acuity myocardial infarction and hemorrhagic stroke. The trauma simulation also includes highly sensitive scenarios, such as infant abandonment and sexual assault. Students teams are assigned to a particular zone within the emergency department (ED) and collaborate with other professions on all aspects of patient care from admission to the ED through discharge to a hospital unit, intensive care, or home. Standardized patients, high-fidelity manikins, and volunteer community members depict the roles of patients and family members. A structured, one-hour debrief session follows the simulation. Huddles and debriefs are also provided throughout the highly sensitive scenarios, as needed. During huddle and debrief sessions, interprofessional education discussion topics include values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, teamwork, and interprofessional communication tools.
Date Approved
9/26/2017
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Title

Convergence Days: An Initiative for Interprofessional Education

Description
Convergence Day is an initiative to enhance the quality of our trainees’ educational experience by providing activities aimed at interprofessional development. Convergence not only enhances students’ learning by improving their knowledge and understanding of health issues and common diseases, but also increases their ability to communicate this knowledge to peers, professionals, patients, and the public. Convergence Day activities are aimed at bridging educational silos through interprofessional learning communities, resulting in greater communication among trainees in various health disciplines. Convergence Day is a multi-institutional IPE day, which brings together medical students from the UT Southwestern Medical School and allied health students from UT Southwestern School of Health Professions, nursing students from both Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing and UT Arlington College of Nursing and Health Innovation, and pharmacy students from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy. Interprofessional teams of students working in small mixed groups learn about, from, and with each other. Exercises introduce roles and responsibilities, communication practices, and elements of TeamSTEPPS®. An annual theme provides focus and content. Learning Objectives - At the end of this session, students will be able to: 1. Recognize roles, responsibilities and professional training for disciplines engaged in health care. 2. Work to solve a problem in a team whose members have a variety of behavioral styles. 3. Identify a communication strategy for a pain patient/client with your DISC style. 1.5 hours: Interprofessional Culture of Safety(Small Groups) Part I: Roles and Responsibilities - Introduction to medical, health professions, nursing, pharmacy and other relevant health professional training programs (30 min) Part II: TeamSTEPPS® Introduction: Problem solving in an interprofessional team (45 min) Part III: Contributions of behavioral styles to patient/client interactions (15 min) 1.5 hours: Interprofessional Panel Discussion (Large Group) 728 interprofessional students, including 75 third year pharmacy students
Date Approved
9/26/2017
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Title

Management of a Hyperglycemic Emergency: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
During this series of IPE simulations, participants are trained to recognize signs and symptoms of hyperglycemic emergencies. The IPE simulations allow the participants to apply standardized teamwork strategies and communication tools to a patient care Rapid Response Team training in order to optimize patient safety and outcomes. The immersive simulations facilitated by faculty allows participants to practice clinical and critical thinking skills, utilize team building and team communication tools, and participate in a facilitated debriefing following the simulation. Specific Learning Objectives for this IPE are as follows: 1. Recognize signs and symptoms of hyperglycemic emergencies. 2. Identify and initiate evidence based practices for hyperglycemic management. 3. Apply appropriate standardized team building strategies to an inter-professional healthcare team. 4. Practice effective team communication. 5. Participate in facilitated debriefing to optimize the IPE learning experience.
Date Approved
9/13/2017
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Title

Utilizing Teamwork during Pediatric Hypovolemic Shock Management: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
During this series of IPE simulations, participants are trained to recognize signs and symptoms of Pediatric Hypovolemic shock due to car vs pedestrian trauma. The IPE simulations allow participants to apply standardized team-building strategies and communication tools to optimize patient safety and outcomes. Faculty orient and assist students in selecting and implementing appropriate strategies and tools, as well as facilitate debriefing to optimize the IPE learning experience. Specific Objectives include: 1) Recognize sign and symptoms of hypovolemic shock 2) Identify and initiate evidence based shock protocols 3) Apply appropriate standardized team-building strategies to an Interprofessional Healthcare Team 4) Practice effective team communication strategies 5) Participate in facilitated debriefing exercise post event to optimize IPE learning experience.
Date Approved
9/13/2017
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Title

Utilizing Teamwork During Code 99 Management: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
During this series of IPE simulations, participants are trained to recognize signs and symptoms of chest pain progressing to coded 99 status. The IPE simulations allow participants to apply standardized teamwork strategies and communication tools to a patient care situation in order to optimize patient safety and outcome. Faculty assist students in selecting appropriate teamwork strategies and communication tools, as well as facilitate the interprofessional student team debrief following the simulation. Specific learning objectives for this IPE simulation are as follows: 1. Recognize sign and symptoms of chest pain. 2. Identify and initiate best practices for code 99 status. 3. Apply appropriate standardized teamwork strategies to an interprofessional healthcare team. 4. Practice effective team communication. 5. Participate in facilitated debriefing to optimize the IPE learning experience.
Date Approved
9/13/2017
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Title

Utilizing Teamwork for Respiratory Arrest Management: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
During the series of IPE simulation, interprofessional teams of students will train to recognize and manage signs and symptoms of respiratory arrest secondary to opiod overdose. The IPE simulation allows participants to apply standardized teamwork strategies and communication tools in a safe simulation setting to improve patient safety and outcomes. Faculty from a variety of healthcare disciplines will assist and participate in facilitated debriefing post event. Learning objectives: 1. Recognize signs and symptoms of respiratory distress worsening to arrest. 2. Identify and initiate evidence based management of patients condition. 3. Apply appropriate standardized teamwork strategies to