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66 activities

Title

Interprofessional Clinical Laboratory Experience: An Interprofessional Didactic and Lab Experience

Description
First year Medical Students and second year undergraduate Clinical Laboratory Science Students will increase their understanding of how physicians-in-training and students preparing for a career as clinical laboratory scientists approach the differential diagnosis and contribute to the treatment of patients with clinical diseases. The case study for a clinical disease will change each year. During this didactic interprofessional learning activity, the 1st year medical students and the senior CLS students will be provided a case study that includes patient history and the signs and symptoms the patient is presenting for a particular hospital visit. This interprofessional activity will require both cohorts to discuss their scope of practice, engage in a shared-learning experience, work collaboratively on the clinical case, and reflect on what they have learned about the content, as well as the interprofessional learning experience.

This IPE event is an interactive learning activity that occurs as an interactive discussion in a lecture room and as an interactive lab experience in the CLS student laboratory.

Student learning objectives are as follows:

1. Senior CLS students will research and prepare each of the laboratory results that could be ordered by a physician pertaining to the designated case study for that year. These tests could encompassed all departments of the clinical lab.
2. First year medical students will enhance their understanding of common laboratory techniques used to help in the differential diagnosis of clinical disease case study chosen for that year. This will be accomplished by the medical students observing the execution and preparation of laboratory experiments by second year undergraduate CLS students in a laboratory setting. The CLS students are also responsible for explaining experimental concepts and the significance of normal versus abnormal test results.
3. Following the laboratory experience, the first year medical students and senior CLS students will participate in small group discussions (1 CLS student to 5 MS1 students) pertaining to the patient’s presenting symptoms, appropriate lab test to order, and the correlation of the patient’s laboratory results. Together, students from both cohorts will use this information to determine and finalize the appropriate diagnosis. During the group discussion IPE topics will also include roles/responsibilities, strategies to increase teamwork, and approaches to interprofessional communication.

Title

Disaster Day: An Interprofessional Mass Casualty Simulation

Description
World Health Organization defines a disaster as an event that overwhelms the local capacity to respond and requires highly coordinated responses from within and outside the affected community. Mass casualty incident and disaster simulations are rapidly becoming a core training exercise for health professions learners. Conducting simulations and drills is the most effective way to evaluate and test disaster preparedness plans. Disaster simulations are also excellent tools for training a wide variety of learners in health-related professions, and for assessing their decision-making processes, teamwork, communication, and coordination skills. During this annual event, interprofessional student teams come together to diagnose, treat and care for standardized patients and populations impacted by a simulated natural disaster or public health emergency. Participating students are better prepared to respond to emergencies, and learn vital skills to practice collaboratively upon graduation.

This event includes:
1. Event brief
2. Teambuilding activity
3. Disaster simulation
4. Facilitated debrief and assessment

Learning Objectives for this Event Include:
1. Practice basics of mass casualty triage.
2. Apply assessment, reasoning, and decision-making skills during an emergency.
3. Facilitate and optimize collaboration through teamwork, communication, values/ethics, and understanding of roles/responsibilities.

Title

TeamSTEPPS® 3.0 Fundamentals Course: An Interprofessional Training

Description
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the Department of Defense (DoD) have developed TeamSTEPPS, a teamwork system that offers a powerful solution to improving collaboration and communication within institutions. Teamwork has been found to be one of the key initiatives within patient safety that can transform the culture within health care. Patient safety experts agree that communication and other teamwork skills are essential to the delivery of quality health care and to preventing and mitigating medical errors and patient injury and harm. TeamSTEPPS is an evidence-based program aimed at optimizing performance among teams of health care professionals, enabling them to respond quickly and effectively to whatever situations arise. This curriculum was developed by a panel of experts, incorporating more than 25 years of scientific research that has been conducted on teams and team performance. TeamSTEPPS is a highly interactive interprofessional experience designed to enhance team dynamics with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety and outcomes.

Fundamental Modules of TeamSTEPPS include:
Team Structure
Communication
Leading Teams
Situational Monitoring
Mutual Support
Implementation and putting it all together

Students participating in TeamSTEPPS 3.0 Fundamental training will gain knowledge and skills to:
1. describe the impact of medical error and the importance of communication and teamwork in error prevention.
2. recognize barriers to effective teamwork and identifying team structure to include the role of the patient.
3. describe how communication affects team processes and outcomes identifying skills of SBAR, call-out, check-back, and handoff.
4. describe the tools for leading teams, including briefs, huddles, and debriefs.
5. understand how a shared mental model affects team effectiveness.
6. describe how mutual support affects team processes and outcomes and identify skills of feedback, assertiveness, 2-challenge rule, and CUS.

Title

Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia: An Interprofessional Problem-Based Learning Activity

Description
Interprofessional problem-based learning (PBL) is a widely used tool to collaboratively educate/train teams of students from a variety of health care professions. Interprofessional PBL is a student-centered teaching/learning method that uses problems relevant to desired learning outcomes as a means of encouraging self-directed learning, critical thinking, lifelong learning, team collaboration, interprofessional communication, and self-evolution among students. Interprofessional PBL requires student collaboration to develop strategies to resolve problems, consider alternative solutions, and justify their solution to others. The goal of this interprofessional PBL activity was for interprofessional teams of students to work collaboratively to solve for a differential diagnosis of aphasia in samples and cases of patients who present with acute onset of changes in functional communication. Interprofessional teams include 2nd year medical students (MS2), graduate occupational therapy students, and graduate speech-language pathology students. The interprofessional PBL activity has 2 components including a component on the anatomical and physiological foundations of aphasia, as well as a differential diagnosis component based on video and case presentations.

Objectives for this interprofessional PBL activity include:

1. Expand teamwork skills essential for health care students to work collaboratively to solve problems.
2. Increase team communication skills during shared learning experiences.
3. Understand the roles and responsibilities of other health care professions in the care of patients with aphasia.

Title

Convergence Days: An Initiative for Interprofessional Education

Description
Convergence Day is an initiative to enhance the quality of our trainees’ educational experience by providing activities aimed at interprofessional development. Convergence not only enhances students’ learning by improving their knowledge and understanding of health issues and common diseases, but also increases their ability to communicate this knowledge to peers, professionals, patients, and the public. Convergence Day activities are aimed at bridging educational silos through interprofessional learning communities, resulting in greater communication among trainees in various health disciplines. Convergence Day is a multi-institutional IPE day, which brings together medical students from the UT Southwestern Medical School and allied health students from UT Southwestern School of Health Professions, nursing students from both Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing and UT Arlington College of Nursing and Health Innovation, and pharmacy students from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy. Interprofessional teams of students working in small mixed groups learn about, from, and with each other. Exercises introduce roles and responsibilities, communication practices, and elements of TeamSTEPPS®. An annual theme provides focus and content.

Learning Objectives - At the end of this session, students will be able to:
1. Recognize roles, responsibilities and professional training for disciplines engaged in health care.
2. Work to solve a problem in a team whose members have a variety of behavioral styles.
3. Identify a communication strategy for a pain patient/client with your DISC style.

1.5 hours: Interprofessional Culture of Safety(Small Groups)
Part I: Roles and Responsibilities - Introduction to medical, health professions, nursing, pharmacy and
other relevant health professional training programs (30 min)
Part II: TeamSTEPPS® Introduction: Problem solving in an interprofessional team (45 min)
Part III: Contributions of behavioral styles to patient/client interactions (15 min)

1.5 hours: Interprofessional Panel Discussion (Large Group)

800+ interprofessional students, including 50+ first year Dallas pharmacy students (2020 is virtual and includes all 120+ first year TTUHSC pharmacy students)

Title

Speech Associated Anatomy: An Interprofessional Gross Anatomy Lab

Description
Anatomy courses provide an ideal platform for interprofessional education learning opportunities. Gross anatomy and dissection activities enable students to work together through a shared experience of understanding anatomical and physiological concepts from different perspectives. The aim of this interprofessional gross anatomy lab is to increase interprofessional collaboration early in students’ healthcare education.

This interprofessional head and neck gross anatomy lab focuses on the dissection of the pharynx, nasal cavity, pterygopalatine fossa,, and oral cavity. Interprofessional teams of students, which include first year medical students (MS1), first year graduate students enrolled in a Graduate Medical Sciences Program (GSBS), and graduate speech-language pathology students (SLP), will be assigned to each cadaver tank. During the lab, interprofessional student teams will work collaboratively to identify head and neck anatomy. For example, medical students identify structural elements to the SLP students. Together the interprofessional teams discuss the physiology of the structures, as well as deficits that occur if these structures are damaged including clinical signs and symptomatically of disease processes. The shared learning of anatomy is an innovative IPE learning activity for the two groups of students because both groups require profound knowledge of human anatomy and its role in the pathogenesis of disease

IPE Objectives:
During the collaborative gross anatomy training, the aim is to foster collaborative teamwork within an atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation. Students are encourage and cued to approached each other without bias and learn about, from and with each other. By working as an interprofessional collaborative team, students discuss roles and responsibility within in collaborative care teams.This will be accomplished by:

1) In an interactive laboratory setting:
a) Medical students will enhance their knowledge of human anatomy by reviewing the anatomy of the head and neck with students training for a career in speech-language pathology.
b) Medical and speech-language pathology students will discuss how embryological anomalies to the head and neck can lead to physical abnormalities resulting in speech disorders such as including cleft palate and cleft lip.

2) Through these two processes, students will:
a) Expand their understanding of how medical and speech-language pathology students can learn from each other in a pre-clinical setting
b) Strengthen interprofessional communication skills
c) Apply the principles of team dynamics to enhance their knowledge of developmental anomalies that lead to speech disorders

Title

Do No Harm: An Interprofessional Patient Safety Simulation with SPs

Description
Preventable medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., claiming the lives of over 400,000 patients each year. These numbers underscore the need for patient safety training and education for healthcare professionals. Interprofessional education and practice are critical to patient safety and improved patient care. Additionally, as interprofessional teams are becoming increasingly important in health care delivery, the benefits of interprofessional collaboration are becoming more apparent and can lead to increased patient safety and reduced incidence of medical errors. The purpose of this interprofessional patient safety event is to highlight the role of team-based care in order to identify and resolve potential medical errors and hazards, discuss root causes in cases of medical error, and practice disclosure of medical errors as a team.

Interprofessional education and collaborative practice will be addressed throughout the event. Event outline includes:
1. Event Brief
2. Keynote presentation - Patient Safety
3. Interprofessional small group discussion – room of hazards videos. Interprofessional teams of 10-12 students will watch 3 videos of simulated rooms of hazards to identify safety issues, discuss consequences of potential hazards, and provide patient-centered solutions for the hazards.
4. Interprofessional Simulation with SPs - teams will complete a communication and resolution program CRP simulation with SPs following a medication error that resulted in fatal harm to a patient. Teams will be trained on the CRP process and then complete the discussion with an SP playing the family member of the patient that was harmed.
4. Facilitated debrief – interprofessional teams will complete a facilitated debrief to reflect on learning objectives and team functioning.
5. Learner assessment – learners will complete a post-event survey.

Student learning objectives for this event include:
1. Discuss a medical error in a blame-free way as an interprofessional team.
2. Plan a CRP and disclose a medical error as an interprofessional team with honesty, compassion and respect for team members.
3. Articulate each team member’s role in this patient’s care and each team member’s contribution to a medical error.
4. Participate as a member of a team to identify safety hazards in health care and provide patient-centered solutions to reduce medical errors.

Title

A Day in the Emergency Department: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
The purpose of the interprofessional (IP) emergency center (EC) simulation is to immerse interprofessional (IP) teams of students in “a day in the life” of a healthcare professional working in an EC. Students from TTUHSC nursing, pharmacy, physician assistant, and public health programs along with firefighter/EMT/paramedic, respiratory therapy, and social work students within the community collaborate to deliver high quality and safe patient-centered care as members of an interprofessional team. The simulation design includes 25 evidence-based scenarios ranging in acuity level from "walk-in" clinic diagnoses, such as otitis media, to high acuity myocardial infarction and hemorrhagic stroke. The trauma simulation also includes highly sensitive scenarios, such as infant abandonment and sexual assault. Students teams are assigned to a particular zone within the emergency department (ED) and collaborate with other professions on all aspects of patient care from admission to the EC through discharge to a hospital unit, intensive care, or home. Standardized patients, high-fidelity manikins, and volunteer community members depict the roles of patients and family members. A structured, one-hour debrief session follows the simulation. Huddles and debriefs are also provided throughout the highly sensitive scenarios, as needed. During huddle and debrief sessions, IP education discussion topics include values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, teamwork, and IP communication tools.

Title

Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS): An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
Millions of Americans, many of whom are children, live in poverty every day. Many more have incomes above the poverty line, but their incomes are still low enough to qualify for programs like Food Stamps and Medicaid. The aim of this interprofessional poverty simulation is to build empathy for patients with financial insecurities, as well as to teach students about disparities in health and living conditions within a community. The Community Action Poverty Simulation (CAPS) originated in Missouri with the Missouri Association for Community Action. The interprofessional poverty simulation includes interprofessional teams of students who are divided into pre-determined families with the goal of making it through a month of working and paying bills while facing the challenges of a low income family. Pre-determined families have various financial scenarios that range from having low-income jobs to living off social security. Student teams have to figure out how to use the money in their scenario to support their simulation families with the provided services within the simulation. Each simulation also includes multiple university and community volunteers who act as service providers such as daycare workers, employment office personnel, pawnshop workers, schoolteachers, and healthcare workers. The simulation is divided into four fifteen minute segments – each representing a week of the month. As the simulation progresses, the students were challenged to collaborate among themselves and work with available institutions and resources to provide food, water, shelter and miscellaneous expenses for a one-month period. Students must also collaborate and work with agencies and organizations including public schools and work environments, utility and mortgage companies, pawn and quick loan agencies, grocery stores, pharmacies, health care facilities, as well as social service agencies. At the end of the simulation, students break into small interprofessional groups led by trained debriefers to discuss their experience of living the life of a low-income family. The CAPS provides realistic situations and creates opportunities for students to experience the stress, emotions, physical and financial distress that people experience every day when engaging with the healthcare system.

Title

Best Practices in Care-Planning for Infants and Toddlers with Developmental Delays/Disabilities: An Interprofessional Case-Based Learning Activity

Description
Clinical cases are essential teaching tools in helping students move from didactic knowledge and theory to real-world clinical contexts. Additionally, case studies are a valuable tool to help students learn the concepts of IPE and the thought processes around coordination of care. In preparation for the Interprofessional Toy Fair and Expo, small teams of students from audiology, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology will discuss roles and responsibilities, teamwork, and communication during a case-study activity to build team relations and collaborations. This IPE learning activity will help prepare teams of students for effective teamwork and communication during the Interprofessional Toy Fair and Expo. Concepts in IPE will be intentionally discussed during the activity brief and with case study discussion questions.

During this IPE learning activity, small groups of students will work collaboratively in the following activities.
1. Team-building activity
2. Case study analysis of a toddler with development delays and/or disabilities
3. Toy analysis planning for the Interprofessional Toy Fair and Expo

The objectives of this case study activity are:
1. Students will relate their professions other’s roles and responsibilities in the coordinated plan of care for an infant or toddler with a development delay and/or disability.
2. Students will work collaboratively on a team with other healthcare professionals to create a coordinated plan of care for infant or toddler with a development delay and/or disability.

Title

Rapid Cycle Improvement to Optimize Patient Safety: An Interprofessional Didactic and Experiential Project

Description
According to the Institute of Medicine, the work environment in which nurses provide care to patients can determine the quality and safety of patient care. As the largest health care workforce, patient care is frequently centered on the work of nurses. Nurses must rapidly and consistently apply their knowledge, skills, and experience to care for the various and changing needs of patients. Unfortunately, when patients receive subpar care and medical errors occur, whether because of resource allocation, poor healthcare team communication or collaboration, or because of a lack of appropriate policies, protocols, and standards, nurses shoulder much of the responsibility. This reflects the continued misunderstanding of the greater effects of poor team collaboration and the complex work environment. Understanding the complexity of the work environment and engaging in strategies to improve its effects is paramount to higher-quality, safer care. The purpose of this interprofessional performance measurement improvement project is to examine improvement sciences with a specific emphasis on “rapid cycle improvement” demonstrating the use of various data to monitor the outcomes of processes to improve team collaboration and optimize the clinical work environment. Specifically graduate MSN in Nursing Education students will examine the science of improvement as a foundation for change and improvement, including the Model for Improvement, change concepts, developing change for improvement, measuring change and sustaining improvements.

During this didactic IPE activity, students will work with their clinical partner, like their facility, to identify an area of needed performance measurement and improvement area to address within their interprofessional health care setting. The student will interview members of the interprofessional health care team and use the results of the interprofessional interviews to identify and implement an improvement within their workplace, which can be addressed by using “front line engagement” and rapid cycle improvement. The performance measurement and improvement plan must include a two or more health care professionals involved in the process, including professional team members such as nurses, physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and allied health professionals. Following implementation of the performance measurement and improvement plan, the student will development & submit a PowerPoint presentation demonstrating how applied rapid cycle improvement and “front line engagement” impacted team-based care delivery within the interprofessional environment. Students will also develop a class forum posting to discussing their IPE learning experience in using IHI Rapid Cycle Improvement via “front-line engagement” emphasizing the interprofessional team roles in this process. During this discussion forum, students must reflect on roles and responsibilities of team members, team dynamics, and team communication strategies.

Title

The Nurse Midwife's Role in Team-based Women's Health Care: An Interprofessional Experiential Program

Description
Collaborative practice is a key element in maternity care and is critical to the scope of practice for nurse midwives. Midwifery is a collaborative profession that normally consults and collaborates with other health care providers, which is essential to excellent midwifery care, and a fundamental building block in the integration of midwifery into team-based maternity care. Intentionally incorporating interprofessional education into the practicum program in maternity care for nurse midwife students will improve participant knowledge of roles of respective disciplines, improve skills and attitudes by promoting an environment of mutual learning, improve interprofessional relationship development, communication, willingness to collaborate, and improve delivery of woman-centered care within a collaborative clinical setting

In NURS 6620, advanced practice nursing (APRN) students in the nurse-midwifery program will participate in a clinical immersion practicum that includes interprofessional experiences. This integrated practice experience synthesizes previously learned theory and clinical knowledge with interprofessional engagement among students, preceptors, and other members of the healthcare team. Focusing on the collaborative management of selected complications through effective interprofessional communication and skill-sharing, this integrated practice experience will prepare graduates to function efficiently, effectively, and respectfully as team members in the provision of women’s health care. The integration of this interprofessional education into a practicum immersion course expands the student’s foundational interprofessional education learning beyond the online classroom and into the health care facilities (e.g., hospitals, clinical practices, diagnostic centers, birth centers) that aspire to “best practice” team-based care. Interprofessional education is integrated into this course in the following manner:

1. Prior to the practicum experience, students will complete a Pre-Practicum Self-Assessment and Evaluation form in order to select goals for strategic growth in clinical and collaborative skills. Students must self-assess their knowledge, skills, and values for both maternity care and collaborative practice. The students must then reflect, in narrative form, on their past experiences to select practicum goals for collaborative skill development (e.g., How would you rate your interprofessional practice experiences with residents, medical students, physicians, and other professionals in pharmacy, laboratory services, diagnostic imaging, and social work at this point in your education? Which aspect of your interprofessional interaction needs the most focus this semester, examples include consultation, collaborative management, or referral of care). Students then share their collaborative practice goals with their preceptor to develop a practicum plan to directly target areas of needed growth.

2. During the clinical practicum, students will actively participate in the provision of collaborative care. Students must participate in and document evidence of collaborative practice activities under the direction of their preceptor. Example activities include:
a. Works effectively within the interprofessional team to ensure clinical operations progress smoothly, including providing an organized report.
b. Identifies and implements appropriate interprofessional management of consultation, collaboration, or referral as needed, informing the woman of the purpose and rationale for these actions.
c. Practices leadership skills in interactions with staff.
d. Orders or refers interprofessionally for timely and relevant diagnostics.
e. Differentiates consultation, collaboration, and referral situations in interprofessional management of deviations from normal.
f. Identifies and reports deviations immediately to preceptor, prior to physician
g. Provides appropriate interprofessional interventions & referrals for stillbirth & conditions incompatible with life.
h. Conducts an organized interprofessional presentation to physician or other relevant health professional.

3. Each student will receive midterm and final practicum evaluations from their preceptor that includes formative and summative feedback regarding knowledge, skill, and values acquisition in both maternity care and collaborative practice. Student are also given formative feedback throughout the practicum experience based on reflection and feedback sessions with their preceptor to guide collaborative practice participation.

Course objectives:
(1) Provide comprehensive, full-scope basic nurse-midwifery care, with emphasis placed on the management of common deviations and collaborative management of selected complications.
(2) Differentiate consultation, collaboration, and referral in interprofessional team-based care.
(3) Refine interprofessional communication skills and processes.
(4) Discuss the issues surrounding transition to the professional practice role in a team setting.
(5) Demonstrate the contributions of team patient management to improved quality of care
(6) Recognize the benefits of interprofessional approaches to health policy development
(7) Evaluate the financial efficacy of team-based care decisions
(8) Evaluate the impact of team-based collaboration on patient satisfaction.


Title

Elimination of Barriers to Medication Access: An Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
Barriers to medication access contribute to health care costs and hospital readmissions. Inpatient and outpatient pharmacists and inpatient social workers work collaboratively with nurses to identify barriers and resources to assist clients in obtaining medications. Knowing about and valuing the skills and responsibilities of other team members and respecting each person’s unique contribution to the work of the team can lead to more effective communication and collaboration in the context of medication access. Completion of this project will increase the nursing students’ knowledge related to interprofessional team members’ roles and relevant professional standards. The nursing student will obtain feedback from the interprofessional team member regarding anticipated changes in the patient care plan after participating in the project.

Students in the Accelerated BSN Program are asked to interview a student or professional pharmacist or social worker in their community. Prior to conducting the interview, the nursing student develops a foundational knowledge of current financial impact related to lack of medications, as well as preliminary knowledge related to public and private programs that assist clients to get their medications. The nursing student develops a set of content questions regarding barriers to medication, as well as questions about role’s/responsibilities and team communication strategies to improve client access and affordability. The student then interviews the pharmacist or social worker to validate barriers encountered and resources to assist these clients, as well as strategies to improve collaboration to prevent access barriers. Students are asked to reflect upon the answers provided to them during the interview process and write a three to four page analysis paper identifying how the content and collaboration information gained will impact current and future practice.

Learning objectives for this interprofessional interview project include:
1. Utilize effective interprofessional communication strategies.
2. Identify the importance of information (written and verbal) and communication with other professionals in client advocacy.
3. Recognize that teamwork and collaborative care are essential skills in promoting medication access.

Title

Annual IPE Fall Symposium: An Interprofessional Case-Based Learning Activity

Description
As the transition to team-based care grows within the practice environment, health professions students must learn to work effectively in teams to optimize the outcomes of the care they will ultimately provide to patients, families, and communities. The Annual IPE Fall Sympsosium is the annual IPE day for TTUHSC across all campuses. Hosted by the Office of Interprofessional Education, the event features a morning keynote speaker that highlights interprofessional practice and education and an afternoon interprofessional case-based learning activity for students. The keynote speaker will target IPE concepts through sharing professional or personal experiences, which exemplifies the connection between team-based care and improved patient outcomes.The afternoon case-based learning activity serves as the registered IPE learning activity. This portion of the IPE Fall Symposium is used as a forum to discuss teamwork, interprofessional communication tools, roles/responsibilities, and values/ethics of patient-centered care. During the case-based learning activity, interprofessional teams of students develop a collaborate plan of care for a mock patient and/or family. The objectives of this IPE Learning Activity include: 1. Develop collaborative practice skills and enhance health care knowledge by assessing, explaining, discussing, systematic reasoning, and applying interprofessional knowledge in the context of clinical case presentations for integrated learning and better long-term recall. 2. Develop and practice the four interprofessional core competencies of roles and responsibilities of health professions, teamwork, interprofessional communication, and values/ethics that will prepare our students to establish and maintain professional relationships with patients, families, and health care team members. 3. Develop the skills of critical thinking, research, evaluation (self & others), teaching, giving and receiving feedback, exploration, and collaboration/teamwork.

Title

The Role of the Family Nurse Practitioner in Collaborative Care: An Interprofessional Experiential Program

Description
Clinical practicum experiences encourage interprofessional engagement among students, preceptors, and other members of the healthcare team. Integrating interprofessional education and collaborative care activities into clinical practicum experiences will foster a new generation of graduates who are capable of demonstrating interprofessional competencies that go beyond those developed within individual academic programs. Further, the collaborative clinical practicum experiences will enrich collaborative learning experiences for students and promote a new level of professional development and leadership, so that graduates will function as effective collaborators when they move into interprofessional health care delivery environments. Collaborative clinical practicum experiences offers students the opportunity to refine their communication skills, collaboration skills, and the specific practice behaviors that help lead them to a successful healthcare career. Learning collaborative skills in an actual practice environment offers multidimensional experiences that are imperative for developing an understanding of how interprofessional teams can and do function in real-world clinical environments. In order to ensure student experiences are occurring in environments that exemplify interprofessional collaborative practice, educators integrate interprofessional learning experiences for students through structured activities within the clinical setting. The integration of the interprofessional education into a clinical practicum course expands the student’s foundational IPE learning beyond the classroom and into health care clinics that effectively demonstrate team-based care.

In N6660, advanced practice nursing (APRN) students in the family nurse practitioner track will participate in an immersive clinical practicum experience to integrate and synthesize the APRN role. APRN students will integrate theoretical and evidence-based knowledge of assessment, diagnosis, management, and evaluation of patients with increasingly complex acute and chronic health problems across the lifespan. Issues related to APRN responsibilities and competencies are addressed. Interprofessional education in integrated into this course in the following manner:

1. Each student is required to document a minimum of four (4) clinical hours during the semester that reflect interprofessional collaborative practice (IPC). To count IPC hours, the student must be actively participating in the role of the advanced practice registered nurse in the collaborative care process with another member of the healthcare team. Examples of IPC activities that could count towards clinical hours include collaboration with and referral to another healthcare processional, attending meetings with members of the health care team, participating in interprofessional rounds, reviewing the plan of care with another member of the team, determining program towards treatment goals with the team, transitioning a patient to another level of care or to another professional, etc.
2. Professionals vary site to site, but APRN professionals commonly interact with physicians, physician assistants, social workers, registered dietitians, pharmacists, medical assistants, respiratory therapists, counselors, and various rehabilitation professionals.
3. During the required interprofessional collaborative practice hours, APRN students will actively participate in the provision of collaborative care.
4. Students will document clinical hours on their "Interprofessional Colleague Verification Statement."
5. Students will then write a Clinical Reflection and Analysis paper. A portion of that paper is dedicated to reflection on the interprofessional collaborative practice experiences. Students must discuss the report on the experiences, the variety of professionals within the experiences, how the experiences reflected collaborative care, and how the experiences shaped their philosophy and perceptions of collaborative health care in a primary care setting.

Course objectives:
1. Effectively implement the role of the APRN through demonstration of clinical competence, professionalism, and accountability.
2. Identify business principles that affect financial viability of a practice, the efficient use of resources, and quality of care.
3. Explore coding/reimbursement issues related to ethical practice management.
4. Initiate collaboration among interprofessional groups to facilitate the development, implementation, and evaluation of care provided to male and female patients across the lifespan.
5. Collaborate with patients by negotiating a mutually acceptable plan of care in the provision of comprehensive care services to include health promotion, disease prevention anticipatory guidance, counseling, and disease management across the lifespan.
6. Translate and apply the best available evidence to continuously improve the quality of clinical practice.

Title

Exploring Collaboration in Primary Care: An Interprofessional Didactic and Experiential Project

Description
Experiential learning activities within a clinical environment encourage interprofessional engagement among students, preceptors, and other members of the healthcare team. Integrating experiential learning into collaborative care activities with other practicing healthcare professionals will foster a new generation of graduates who are capable of demonstrating interprofessional competencies that go beyond those developed within traditional didactic and/or classroom environments. Further, intentionally learning from, with, and about other health care professions within a primary care setting will promote effective collaborations when the student moves into clinical practicum and internships within interprofessional health care delivery environments. The integration of the interprofessional education into the clinical experience portion of a didactic course expands the student’s foundational IPE learning beyond the classroom portion of the course and into health care clinics to effectively demonstrate team-based care concepts. In N5440, advanced practice nursing (APRN) students will integrate theoretical and evidence-based knowledge of assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of patients with acute and chronic health problems across the lifespan. This is a didactic and clinical experiences course that builds upon concepts and skills derived from prerequisite courses. The focus is on development of clinical reasoning and decision-making skills necessary for the provision of safe and effective collaborative health care in a primary care setting. Interprofessional education in integrated into this course in the following manner: 1. Each student is required to document a minimum of four (4) clinical hours during the semester that explore "interprofessional collaborative practice.” During these documented hours student must be engaged in collaborative interaction with one or more health care professionals outside of the nursing or APRN professions scope of practice regarding patient care. Clinical experiences within a practice environment with another profession could take the form of shadowing, guided observations, demonstrations, and/or other skill sharing activities. 2. Professionals vary site to site, but APRN professionals commonly interact with physicians, physician assistants, social workers, registered dietitians, pharmacists, medical assistants, respiratory therapists, counselors, and various rehabilitation professionals. 3. During the required interprofessional collaborative practice hours, APRN students will gain knowledge on teamwork, interprofessional communication, roles/responsibilities, and values/ethics for interprofessional care. 4. Students will document clinical hours on their APN log, which is verified by the collaborating professionals. 5. Students will then write a Clinical Reflection and Analysis paper. A portion of that paper is dedicated to reflection on the interprofessional collaborative practice experiences.

Title

Hazelden Betty Ford Medical and Interprofessional Education Program: A Clinical Observation and Learning Program

Description
Description & Purpose:
The TTUHSC School of Medicine has provided a unique week-long training experience in Substance Use Disorder Treatment at the Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, CA, for over a decade. In 2023, this opportunity expanded to include students from the TTUSHC School of Medicine, School of Nursing, School of Pharmacy and School of Population and Health Professions. Given the prevalence of substance use disorders in our society and its impact and relativeness to all TTUHSC programs of studies and disciplines, this activity is extremely valuable as a training experience in all areas of medicine, health care, and public health. This opportunity is open to students at all campuses and is valuable for students entering all specialties.

Substance use disorder detection and treatment is a vital part of health care and public health practice. Given the prevalence of alcohol and drug addiction and the severity of its potential health and psychological consequence for patients and their families, the purpose of this IPE activity is to give TTUHSC students a solid foundation in this area and well as how to approach substance use disorders as a team that involves inter-professional health and public health disciplines. A one-week training experience at the Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, California is available for twelve students as part of an interprofessional team during a week in March. The weeklong program is experiential in nature, allowing participants to spend the majority of their time immersed in the same activities as the patients or family members at the center. In addition, there are supplemental presentations provided to augment understanding of the diseases of addiction. Participants will either participate in the Inpatient Program or the Residential Day Treatment Program. This experience will involve participating in treatment activities as well as multidisciplinary treatment planning meetings.

Participants will also meet daily as a group during the week to discuss their experiences in each of these programs. Two faculty members will also participate in the same activities as the student participants. This is a unique training experience that is being made available to TTUHSC students through a generous donation. The donors' interest is in preparing future health professionals to optimally deal with evaluating and guiding patients to appropriate treatment when substance use is an issue. The Betty Ford Center is one of the premier treatment facilities in the country and serves as a template for many of the substance use disorder treatment programs existing today.

Aims:
1. Immerse TTUHSC students in the same activities as the patients or family members at the center.
2. Provide supplemental presentations related to substance use disorders and treatments to augment understanding of the diseases of addiction.
3. Participate in the Inpatient Program or the Residential Day Treatment Program as well as multidisciplinary treatment planning meetings.
4. Enhance students’ understanding of the different role of interprofessional health care and public health practitioners as related to substance use disorders and treatment.


Outline:

Pre-program: complete pre-test

Monday:
- Orientation
- Group therapy (residential & day treatment)
- Personal story
- Tour
- Self-care
- Patient lecture (steps 6 & 7 of Alcohols Anonymous)
- “Emotional sobriety”
- Core emotions activity
- Process & Debrief
- Daily reflection sheet (individual activity)
Tuesday:
- Day 1 take-aways
- “Spirituality & Recovery” lecture
- Group therapy (residential & day treatment)
- Case studies
- Self-care
- Patient lecture
- “Family systems”
- Process & Debrief
- Daily reflection sheet (individual activity)
Wednesday:
- Day 2 take-aways
- “Beyond words: exploring the depths of trauma and healing through psychedelic therapy”
- “Sober fun”
- Case studies
- Self-care
- Community meeting
- “Finding Happiness in Recovery”
- Process & Debrief
- Daily reflection sheet (individual activity)
Thursday:
- Day 3 take-aways
- “12 Steps” lecture
- Group therapy (residential & day treatment)
- Case studies
- Qi-gong presentation & physical activity
- Self-care
- Patient lecture
- SUD counselor personal story
- Process & Debrief
- Daily reflection sheet (individual activity)
Friday:
- Day 4 take-aways
- “post-test & final evaluation
- MSU interdisciplinary team meeting
- Group therapy
- Post-test & final evaluation
- Closing Luncheon with BCF staff
- Process, Debrief, and Wrap-up
- Daily reflection sheet (individual activity)

Learning objectives:
1. To gain in-depth understanding of the addiction process recovery (practitioner perspective)
2. Understand individual’s perception of addiction recovery
3. Identify the 12 steps involved in the Alcohol Anonymous’ program, using both on a spiritual and non-religious approach
4. Explain the process, benefits, concept, and design of group therapy
5. Compare and contrast the process and

Title

Medication Cleanout: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Event

Description
Community engagement provides the opportunity for interprofessional learning, as interprofessional teams of students work side-by-side to respond to challenges faced by communities. Interprofessional community engagement activities provide students with knowledge about the community (including assets within the community), as well as allow students to develop trusting collaborative care relationships, learn social determinants of health, be flexible, and foster a long-term commitment to staying engaged in the community. Interprofessional community engagement learning experiences also have the potential to increase students’ comfort in developing relationships with patients and families from different cultures and who have different lifestyles and socialization.

In Texas, poisonings are second only to motor vehicle accidents as a cause of death from unintentional injury. Unused medications in the home can be the source of these poisonings. Additionally, poisonings are not limited to children, just under half of calls to poison centers are about teens and adults. Furthermore, abuse of prescription medications is one of the fastest-growing drug problems in the nation. This is particularly a problem among teens. Prescription drug abuse is now second only to marijuana abuse. Parents, grandparents, friends, or acquaintances are frequently the unknowing source. The sharing of medicine with others is an unsafe & potentially deadly practice. Self-treatment with an inadequate supply of antibiotics can result in antibiotic resistance and a delay in appropriate medical attention. The use of medications by others for illness or pain can be harmful as well.

Medication Cleanout is a community event designed (1) to prevent medication poisonings, (2) to prevent medication abuse, and (3) to prevent medication misuse by promoting proper disposal of unsafe and expired medications in an environmentally responsible manner and to provide medication safety education to the event participants. Medication Cleanout event takes place twice per year, one in Fall Semester and one in Spring Semester on the Abilene, Amarillo, and Lubbock campuses. The first Medication Cleanout event occurred in Amarillo, TX on 2009. Since then, there have been over 60 Medication Cleanout™ events across TTUHSC campuses with disposal of more than 50,000 pounds of unwanted medication. These medications are no longer available as a source for poisonings, abuse, misuse or environmental contamination.

During this event, the health profession students will have an opportunity for interprofessional collaboration to complete various tasks required for the appropriate disposal of unsafe and expired medications. Type of tasks include greeting the public/event participants and administering a survey, collecting unused medications at the drive-through, obscuring patient information from prescription bottles, sorting controlled substances from non-controlled and over the counter medications, and collecting research data regarding these items. Through this interaction health profession students will see first-hand the magnitude of the problem of medication non-compliance and medication waste as well as learn about the importance of proper disposal and the medication safety education. Students will also have the opportunity to interact with law enforcement officials that are on-site to ensure appropriate and legal procedure and processes are maintained; allowing them to develop introductory relationships with critical community officials. Supervision of these events is provided by health profession faculty members and community law enforcement officials as well as staff from the Texas Panhandle Poison Center of TTUHSC.

Agenda of the events are as follows:

One day prior to events: All new volunteers attend one training session conducted from 5:30-6:30 pm on the respective event campus.
Shift 1: 9:15 am to 2:15 am: Check-in and work at one of the assigned tasks
Shift 2: 2:00 pm to 7:00 pm: Check-in and work at one of the assigned tasks

The interprofessional community engagement event is structured as follows:
1. Interprofessional pre-event huddle/training: During the huddle and training session, students will go over team assignments, roles and responsibilities, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics related to the event participants. Students will then work together to complete the assigned tasks.
2. Interprofessional community engagement event: Health profession students will be stationed in various tasks to promote proper disposal of unsafe and expired medications in an environmentally responsible manner and to provide medication safety education to the event participants. They will learn about the importance of protecting patient privacy and confidentiality as well as the need to remove protected health information from medication labels prior to sending these meds to be processed at various stations.

In addition to completing the assigned tasks, health profession student teams will be distributing medication safety materials and information to event. This may include information regarding methods and locations for the proper disposal of medications (e.g., how to dispose controlled medication in a non-retrievable manner, where to dispose sharps) year round (not just at events) and the resources to contact in case of the accidental/non-accidental poisoning events (e.g., contact information of the poisoning center, 1-800-222-1222).

3. Feedback and survey: Following the event, students complete a feedback sheet and an interprofessional education survey of 5 questions related to interprofessional practice and education.

Objectives:
1. Examine the roles and responsibilities of a variety of healthcare professionals participating in a community engagement event.
2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional community engagement event.

Title

Rural Community and Global Health: Two Interprofessional Certificate Programs

Description
The purpose for interprofessional certificates is to meet the supplemental education needs of professionals. As jobs and job-related responsibilities change, a person often needs additional training in a specific area. An interprofessional certificate program is a set of courses that provides in-depth knowledge in a subject matter.

The Interprofessional Certificate in Rural Community Health is designed for professionals who are practicing or plan to practice in rural communities. The Interprofessional Certificate in Global Health is designed for professionals who are practicing or plan to practice in global communities. These 12 credit hour, online certificate programs include two core courses with an individualized practicum experience during the third semester in the principle area of interest. The three courses are consecutive, building over three semesters (fall, spring and summer) culminating in either a Rural Community Health Certificate or Global Health Certificate. Upon completion, graduates will have the foundational knowledge and skills to engage in a variety of settings in medically underserved areas around the world.

Interprofessional Education is targeted in the following ways:

1. Students in the certificate programs are typically a mix of professionals including, but are not limited to, students from nursing, health professions, medicine, pharmacy, public health, engineering, family studies, among many others. Students actively participate in course discussion forums and message board as part of course assignments each semester.
2. Instructors for the program are from a variety of professional backgrounds and develop course content targeting interprofessional collaboration and teamwork.
3. Each student is required to complete a capstone project/practicum experience. Capstone projects are individualized to the student’s interests and goals; however, each project requires the student to work with a team of rural health or global health professionals to better the health and/or safety of local patient populations. During this project, the student has significant interaction with other health professionals with the purpose of collaborating and coordinating health initiatives.

Objectives for these interprofessional certificate programs include:

1. Examine theories, research and current evidence related to access to care, epidemiology, culture considerations, environment, epigenomics, and health care disparities across rural communities and global health settings.
2. Describe the interprofessional role in issues related to advocacy for health policy change across rural and global health settings.
3. Explore ethical considerations and human rights needs for identified rural community and global health populations.
4. Examine health care delivery systems in rural communities and global health settings.
5. Identify strategies for designing and evaluating care processes for improving health care delivery.
6. Describe examples of how technology and information management tools are used to maximize resources for health care delivery in rural communities and global health settings.
7. Synthesize current evidence related to prevalence and management of non-communicable diseases and infectious diseases in rural communities and global health settings as a partner of an interprofessional team.
8. Analyze the interprofessional role in response to issues related to maternal child health and gender, mental health, and violence.
9. Explore pharmacological, non-pharmacological, and complimentary alternative medicine interventions in areas with limited resources.
10. Identify strategies for emergency preparedness and accident prevention in rural communities and global health settings.
11. Examine disease patterns and variations of disease in selected rural communities and global health settings with emphasis on sanitation, water access and quality, and nutrition.
12. Identify strategies for empowering communities to engage in health promotion.
13. Integrate available technology and evidence based strategies in an interprofessional team approach to a selected problem in a rural community or global health setting.
14. Apply knowledge of interprofessional team roles to a selected rural community or global health setting.
15. Design, implement, and evaluate a selected clinical project in a rural community or global health setting using a team-based model of care.

Title

Role of the Team in Discharge Planning: An Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
The transition from hospital to post-hospital care for those with a chronic health condition represents a time of increased vulnerability for the patient and the caregiver. It has been reported that 14% percent of individuals discharged from hospitals in 2018 were readmitted within 30 days following discharge (Weiss & Jiang, 2021). When seeking to optimize a patient's ability to self-manage their chronic health condition planning for discharge is a key component in treatment. The involvement of the caregiver and the interprofessional healthcare team is fundamental to achieving a successful discharge and diminishing the risk of readmission.

In this interprofessional interview project, students have didactic immersion into CMS and Joint Commission standards on managing transitions of care and a multidisciplinary approach to discharge planning. A major learning objective for this module states the student will: “Utilize an appropriate discharge planning strategy in developing an intervention based on patient and caregiver concerns and needs.” The assignment toward addressing this objective requires each student to interview a clinical social worker and a nurse practicing in the home care arena to determine the interviewees' observations of patient & caregiver knowledge regarding self-management of chronic health conditions, learning deficits, and recommendations on how to improve discharge teaching. The student also will reflect on the value of interprofessional collaboration during transitions in care.

To complete the learning activities, the student composes questions drawn from material covered in the CMS Joint Commission Standards module that they want to ask the interviewees. The purpose of the interviews is to determine how best to prepare a patient for transition from acute care to home or rehabilitation facility and identify 3 interprofessional or collaborative care strategies to reduce hospital readmissions. Students then summarize the findings of the interviews in a recorded audio presentation which is then uploaded to the Discussion forum embedded in the course.

Students then are expected to listen to at least one, preferably two other posted presentations and provide feedback to those students via the discussion board, with an emphasis on teamwork and collaboration to improve patient outcomes
.
Some suggested questions are offered below.
1. Name of each interviewee and credentials.
2. The types of organizations the interviewees are affiliated with for their practice, i.e. hospital, clinic, clinic pharmacy, retail pharmacy, long-term care facility, etc.
3. The types of patients they care for and the assistance that is provided.
4. The level of engagement with caregivers and family members.
5. What has been their professional observation about the knowledge patients have regarding disease, medication needs, post-hospital rehabilitation plans?
6. What are educational deficits regarding healthcare of the clients they see?
7. Ideas on how to improve discharge teaching for the patient and caregivers.
8. Other questions or avenues of thought you wish to explore as the interviews progress.

Evaluation of the assignment uses a rubric that evaluates the content of the students’ presentations and responses looking for integration of module content and use of outside research in their analysis of the interviews and the developed interprofessional recommendations. The ability to connect concepts and ideas from the students’ learning and research with material drawn from the interviews is a key aspect of determining the successful outcome of the oral presentation.

Title

Basic Life Support for Healthcare Professionals: An Interprofessional Skills Training and Simulation

Description
Interprofessional basic life support (BLS) training is of paramount importance for healthcare professionals, providing them with standardized skills that are essential in critical situations. This comprehensive training not only ensures that individual healthcare providers are adept at life-saving techniques but also emphasizes the significance of coordinated, team-based responses. Multi-rescuer BLS skills training further refines the ability of healthcare teams to work seamlessly together during emergencies. Following the knowledge test, the facilitated debrief session becomes a critical component, fostering open communication and reflection on teamwork dynamics. Discussions on roles, communication strategies, and collaborative problem-solving enhance the overall effectiveness of the team. In high-stakes situations, the cohesion of an interprofessional healthcare team can make the difference between successful resuscitation and adverse outcomes, making such training and debriefing sessions invaluable in promoting patient safety and well-coordinated care.

Following completion of the standard BLS for healthcare professionals, teams of learners will participate in the skills training to develop competency is multi-rescuer BLS. Following skills training, knowledge testing, and competency testing, learners will participate in an interprofessional debrief, which includes reflections on teamwork, communication, and roles/responsibilities.

Learning objectives for this IPE experience include:

1. Demonstrate Proficiency in Individual Basic Life Support Techniques: Participants will be able to showcase competence in individual basic life support skills, including chest compressions, rescue breathing, and defibrillator operation, through hands-on simulations and assessments.

2. Execute Multi-Rescuer Basic Life Support in a Team Setting: Learners will develop the ability to effectively collaborate within an interprofessional team during simulated emergencies, demonstrating proper communication, role allocation, and coordinated execution of multi-rescuer BLS techniques.

3. Participate in a Facilitated Debrief to Enhance Team Dynamics: Participants will engage in a facilitated debrief session post-training, focusing on teamwork, communication, and role effectiveness. They will learn to analyze and discuss team performance, identify areas for improvement, and implement constructive feedback to enhance overall team dynamics in future emergency scenarios.

Title

Stop the Bleed: An Interprofessional Skills Training and Simulation

Description
Stop the Bleed training holds immense importance for interprofessional teams of learners as it equips them with life-saving skills in emergency situations. In diverse healthcare settings, professionals from various disciplines, including nursing, medicine, and allied health, often collaborate to provide comprehensive care. A formal Stop the Bleed training program ensures that members of these interprofessional teams are well-prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to severe bleeding incidents. The training covers crucial techniques such as wound packing, tourniquet application, and pressure application, fostering a shared knowledge base among team members. This not only enhances the overall resilience of the healthcare system but also promotes a culture of preparedness and teamwork. In emergencies, the ability of an interprofessional team to act cohesively and decisively can make a significant difference in preventing further harm and saving lives.

During Stop the Bleed training, interprofessional teams will complete the training together including skills training. Following the training, teams will complete a facilitated debrief which includes reflections on teamwork, communication, and roles/responsibilities.

Title

Immersive Healthcare Training for Collaborative Practice: An Interprofessional Virtual Reality Simulation

Description
Virtual reality (VR) offers a revolutionary approach to training interprofessional teams in healthcare, enhancing collaboration, problem-solving, and patient-centered care. Through immersive simulations, participants can engage in realistic scenarios that mimic complex healthcare environments. Interprofessional teams, comprising professionals from diverse disciplines, can collaboratively navigate and address challenging situations, fostering a deeper understanding of each other's roles and perspectives. VR allows learners to practice communication skills, teamwork, and decision-making in a risk-free environment, promoting effective collaboration. Furthermore, by integrating patient-centered scenarios, healthcare providers can develop empathy and a holistic approach to patient care. This innovative use of virtual reality not only improves the technical skills of healthcare professionals but also cultivates a collaborative mindset, ultimately enhancing the quality of patient care through more effective teamwork and problem-solving.

During this IPE experience learners from the nursing and physician assistant programs will be paired to complete a series of VR simulations with a faculty facilitator. Each simulation is ~15-30 minutes in length. Following the simulation, learners will debrief with their faculty facilitator regarding collaboration, clinical problem-solving, and patient-centered care.

The learning objectives are as follows:
• Demonstrate interprofessional collaboration: Participants will demonstrate effective and timely interprofessional collaboration skills by interacting and coordinating with other members of the healthcare team to optimize patient care outcomes in medical virtual reality simulations
• Manage Emergent Situations: Participants will demonstrate competency in managing emergent situations within medical virtual reality scenarios, including rapid assessment, stabilization, and initiation of appropriate interventions in accordance with established protocols and guidelines, within their respective scope of practice.
• Reflect on Clinical Practice: Participants will engage in reflective practice activities to analyze their performance, identify areas for improvement, and integrate feedback from peers and faculty to enhance clinical skills and decision-making abilities in future virtual reality learning experiences and clinical practice.

Title

Interprofessional Assistive Technology Seminar (IATS): A Set of Interprofessional Workshops

Description
The Interprofessional Assistive Technology Seminar (IATS) implements an interprofessional teaching team, including occupational therapists, physical therapists, assistive technology professionals, speech-language pathologists, and audiologists to bring hands-on clinical training to interprofessional teams of doctor of physical therapy students and masters of occupational therapy students. The teams of physical therapy and occupational students will attend seminar break-out sessions focused on: power wheelchair and drive options, gait trainers and standers, seating systems, manual wheelchairs, assistive technology (AT) that aids manipulation, augmentative and alternative communication, and assistive technology that aids in hearing and communication for adult and pediatric patient populations. There will be a total of seven 45 minute breakout sessions with case-based learning scenarios, wherein interprofessional student teams will apply content information to patient-centered care in a collaborative care environment. Occupational therapy and physical therapy students will be randomly assigned to interprofessional teams and will rotate through a variety of breakout sessions. IPE will be addressed in the following manner:

1. During the beginning of each breakout sessions, facilitators will define roles/responsibilities of a variety of health professionals related to the assistive technology during that session. At the conclusion of each breakout session facilitators will address the need for teamwork and communication across health care professionals dealing with the assistive technology.
2. At the end of the seminar, all students will participate in an interprofessional debrief session to recap content and IPE learning objectives for the seminiar. In addition, a time of facilitator led discussion on how interprofessional communication is needed when implementing assistive technology in a collaborative care environment.
3. Following the event, a student survey for PT and OT students will be given to assess interprofessional practice and education related to the IATS.

Detailed description of breakout sessions:
1. Assistive Technology (AT) Demos: NMES for swallowing, sEMG for swallowing, AT for hearing loss, AT for fine motor impairments, gait trainers, AAC devices, driving adaptions and lifts, manual wheelchairs. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes to through these learning opportunities.
2. Permobil: TiLite manual wheelchairs, Roho cushions, and Permobil power wheel chairs. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes in this section.
3. Easystand standers, seating systems, manual wheelchairs, and AT for ADL's. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes in this section.
4. Sunrise Medical: Power and manual wheelchairs by Quickie, and seating systems by Jay products. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes in this section.
5. Invacare: Seating systems and manual chairs. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes in this section.
6. Pride Mobility: Power wheel chairs and driving options for chairs. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes in this section.
7. Applications of AT demos: Four Assitive Technology Professionals will demonstrate seating systems, pressure relief mapping assessments, and manual wheel chairs. Each interprofessional team will have 45 minutes in this section.

Title

Orthopaedic Screening for the Nurse Practitioner: An Interprofessional Skills Training

Description
The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) and Masters in Athletic Training (MAT) programs collaborate to instruct Nurse Practitioners returning for their Advanced Nurse Practitioner training in 1) orthopaedic screening of the shoulder 2) orthopaedic screening of the hip, and 3) upper and lower quadrant neurologic screening. DPT and MAT students are recruited to instruct the Nurse Practitioners on all 3 topics. Gary Kearns, PT, ScD and Larry Munger, MAT, PhD facilitate each small group.

Purpose: Provide a small group, break-out session on 1) orthopaedic screening of the shoulder 2) orthopaedic screening of the hip, and 3) upper and lower quadrant neurologic screening to Nurse Practitioners in order to discuss how to screen and identify patients presenting with neuromusculoskeletal conditions that may benefit from a referral to a rehabilitation specialist for conservative care vs. referral to a medical specialist for further diagnostic work up.

Aim: Engage in a collaborative discussion between DPT, MAT and Nurse Practitioner students on the most efficient means to screen and manage patients with neuromusculoskeletal conditions that may benefit from a referral to a rehabilitation specialist for conservative care vs. referral to a medical specialist for further diagnostic work up. The goal is to reduce time before a patient sees the most appropriate health care provider and minimize total out of pocket cost.

Outline (time varies, but this breakout session is 2 hours)
10-10:15 a.m.: Intro lecture
10:15-10:45: Station #1: Shoulder Screening
10:45-11:15: Station #2: Hip Screening
11:15-11:45: Station #3: Upper/Lower Quadrant Neurologic Screening
11:45-12:00: Wrap up, reflections, and Q&A
**Note** the Nurse Practitioners split up equally between the three stations. All three stations run simultaneously. After 30 minutes, the students will rotate to the next station until they have attended all three stations

Learning Objectives:
- Demonstrate the appropriate screening assessment to identify a patient presenting with shoulder pain that may benefit from a referral to a rehabilitation specialist
- Demonstrate the appropriate screening assessment to identify a patient presenting with hip pain that may benefit from a referral to a rehabilitation specialist
- Demonstrate the appropriate screening assessment to identify a patient presenting with radiculopathy and/or peripheral nerve entrapment that would benefit from a referral to a rehabilitation specialist
- Discuss scenarios of patients with neuromusculoskeletal conditions that may benefit from a referral to a rehabilitation specialist for conservative care vs. referral to a medical specialist for further diagnostic work up with DPT and MAT students and faculty.

Title

AGAPE: An Interprofessional Student-Run Free Clinic

Description
Agape Clinic Global Health is a student-run evening clinic at Agape Clinic in east Dallas. The Agape Clinic is a charity clinic that has been established for almost 40 years and has opened their facilities for TTUHSC School of Pharmacy and UT Southwestern students and faculty to use during specified afternoon and evening hours. Monthly, on weekday nights, the clinic serves both primary care and specialist needs, which include endocrinology, pediatrics, and ENT. Students have the opportunity to practice their patient care skills and bedside manner, as well as interact with patients, health profession students, and UTSW physicians and TTUHSC SOP preceptors. Students from different professions, including pharmacy, medicine, pre-med, nursing, and PA, collaborate to provide care for the underserved population. By working together, students can use their strengths from each of their professions to educate each other and enhance patient care outcomes. The AGAPE clinic serves to: 1. Provide high quality, free medical care to the underserved population of the east Dallas community regardless of ability to pay. 2. Provide an interprofessional learning environment for teams of students, thereby allowing them to develop clinical, organizational, and leadership skills. 3. Instill in students a lifelong commitment of service to the community and others in need. 4. Introduce students to the needs of the uninsured. IPE objectives for this experience include: - Interprofessional teams of students will interview patients together obtaining subjective and objective information - Teams will then discuss a potential assessment and plan together - Teams will then present the patient to the team of interprofessional preceptors, including pharmacist and physician assistant - The interprofessional team will develop a plan with the patient - Students will write a SOAP note of patient encounters in a electronic medical record TTUHSC pharmacy students wanting to receive IPE credit, will write a 1-2 page IPE reflection and/or provide a team-based discussion on IPE, how each role contributed to patient care, what each profession learned from another profession, and what other professions would be able to contribute.

Title

Toy Fair and Expo: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Program

Description
Developmental delays and disabilities, due to an impairment in physical, learning/cognition, communication, or emotional/behavior areas, impacts a child’s day-to-day functioning, and often lasts throughout a person’s lifetime. Early childhood intervention (ECI) services help infants and toddlers with delays and disabilities to learn many key skills and catch up in their development. Lubbock Early Child Intervention (ECI) provides health care services that help babies and toddlers with developmental delays and disabilities. Early childhood intervention focuses on helping eligible babies and toddlers learn the basic and brand-new skills that typically develop during the first three years of life. One of the biggest challenges for a family with an infant/toddler, who has a developmental delay or disability, is selecting and safely using toys to foster growth and development. Toys are the vehicle for learning in infancy, especially for children with a developmental delay or disability.

The Office of Interprofessional Education (IPE) at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) hosts the Interprofessional Toy Fair and Expo for children birth to age 3, who receive early intervention services for developmental delays and disabilities through Lubbock ECI. During this IPE Learning Activity, interprofessional teams of TTUHSC students from audiology, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology, and other health professions will educate families on use of toys to increase physical, cognitive, communicative, social/emotional, and self-help development. Families will also be educated on child safety and prevention of toy-related injuries. Families will participate in educational toy demonstrations, receive educational materials about use of toys to foster development, and each child will receive a therapeutic toy appreciate to his or her developmental delay or disability.

IPE is targeted in the following ways:
1. Roles and Responsibilities: Teams of students work together to learn from, with, and about each other when planning the event, as well as developing educational materials for the families. Students will complete a pre-test assessment of IPE prior to the event.
2. Team and Teamwork: During the facilitated brief before the event, IPE concepts such as teamwork, interprofessional communication, and collaboration will be discussed.
3. Values/Ethics for Interprofessional Practice: Interprofessional teams of students will collaboratively educate families during the event.
4. Interprofessional Education: Following the event, students will participate in a facilitated debrief of the event and core IPE topics. Students will complete a post-test evaluation of IPE following the event.

Title

Shatter the Stigma: An Interprofessional Simulation with Standardized Patients

Description
Because healthcare professionals are typically the first points of contact for a person with a substance use disorder (SUD), they should take the necessary steps to reduce the potential for stigma and negative bias. In this interprofessional simulation with standardized patients, teams of students from diverse professional backgrounds can take the first step in shattering the stigma of SUDs by learning and practicing the use of destigmatizing patient interviewing techniques with standardized patients. During this event interprofessional teamwork, communication, roles/responsibilities, and values/ethics will be address during the following activities:
1. Keynote presentation on team-based care in SUDs and harm reduction strategies
2. Interprofessional interviewing strategies to destigmatize the patient interview in SUDs
3. Small group simulation with SPs - interprofessional teams of ~5 students and a faculty facilitator will review case histories for SPs, they will then work together to interview 2-3 SPs around the topic of SUD using destigmatizing language and interview techniques, and then the team will debrief their team performance with their facilitator.
4. Large group debrief to discuss the simulation
5. Reflect on a personal story of a person in recovery.
6. Complete a team evaluation

Title

Collaborative Care Planning for Residents in Long-term Care Facilities: An Interprofessional Clinical Learning Activity

Description
Multimorbidity is common in older adults in institutional long-term care and skilled nursing facilities. Older adults with multimorbidity impairments in care facilities are affected by the complexity of more than one chronic disease, are known to have poorer quality of life, an increased risk of functional decline, and increased morbidity. To be able to provide the best and safest care possible, interprofessional collaborative care is critical and necessitates an approach that enables optimal collaboration between health care professionals from various professional disciplines. The purpose of this IPE learning activity is to improve student preparedness for working as part of an interprofessional team in a long-term or skilled nursing care setting.

This IPE will involve students from Medicine, Nursing, Health Professions, and Pharmacy. The activity will begin at the Mildred & Shirley L Garrison Geriatric Education & Care Center in Lubbock and expand to other Lubbock local nursing homes.

Description of the event: Faculty in each of the TTUHSC schools will coordinate an interprofessional team of learners to attend a patient care plan at the LTC faculty. During the care plan conference, learners will observe team collaboration around resident-centered care with Garrison staff (social worker, DON/ADON, dietary manager, Director of Rehab, and Activities Director) and LTC family members. Learners will also be encouraged to ask questions and engage in suggestions for care planning. Following the care plan discussions, the interprofessional team of learners will actively participate in a facilitated debrief with TTUHSC faculty to reflect on teamwork, communication, roles and responsibilities of the healthcare team, and values/ethics in this population.

Aims/Learning Objectives:
1. Integrate the complex care of LTC residents into clinical practice.
2. Reflect on the multiple interprofessional roles required to provide patient-centered care for older adults in the LTC setting.

Title

Care Planning for Patients with Mental Health Disorders: An Interprofessional Mock TeleECHO Experience

Description
An interprofessional team plays a crucial role in the effective treatment of patients with mental health disorders, especially in the context of telehealth or teleECHO experiences. Collaborative efforts among professionals from diverse fields such as advanced practice nursing, pharmacy, psychiatry, counseling, social work, and other relevant disciplines ensure a holistic and comprehensive approach to mental health care. In the virtual environment, where direct physical interactions may be limited, the synergy of an interprofessional team becomes even more vital. Professionals can pool their expertise, share insights, and coordinate care plans seamlessly, enhancing the quality of services provided to individuals seeking mental health support through telehealth platforms or teleECHO programs. This collaborative approach not only addresses the complex nature of mental health disorders but also promotes a patient-centered focus that acknowledges the multifaceted aspects of well-being.

In this interprofessional mock TeleECHO experience advance practice nursing students will practice consultation and care planning in complex mental health patients with a interprofessional team that includes two or more disciplines (e.g., social worker, counselor, therapist, pharmacist, physician, etc.). Following the mock TeleECHO experience, learners will submit a reflection on the experience which includes reflection on the IPEC 4 Core Competencies of Teamwork, Values/Ethics, Roles/Responsibilities, and Communication.

Learning objectives include:
1.) To practice consultation and care planning on complex mental health patients.
2.) To develop an interprofessional (IPE) team for consultation in order to learn from each other, which results in improved patient outcomes.
3.) To develop a firm understanding of the roles and purposes of team members participating on an IPE team.
4.) To develop an ethical culturally based plan of care for the patient with the IPE team.
5.) To establish the value of Tele-ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) models in reducing health disparities.

Title

The Escape Room Challenge: An Interprofessional Team-building Activity

Description
In doing this interprofessional escape room, interprofessional teams of healthcare professional students will be challenged to complete a set of puzzles and riddles in order to ‘escape’ a room. To begin, teams are given a brief on the objectives of the activity and provided a patient case scenario to introduce them to the situation. Student teams will enter a room full of hidden puzzles to complete, based on the patient case scenario given. The completion of each puzzle is crucial in the continuation of consecutive puzzles that follow. Students will have 60 minutes to work together and solve their way, in this case, to finding a needed key for the patient. Following the escape room, students will debrief communication and teamwork skills with an IPE facilitator.

Learning Objectives for the Interprofessional Team-Building Activity:

1. Practice efficient teamwork and communication skills needed to provide patient-centered care.

2. Understand how and when to consult with other healthcare professionals based upon roles and responsibilities.

3. Rely on the strengths and weaknesses of others to problem-solve team-building puzzles.

4. Understand how to include the patient and patient’s family in determining next steps and developing a care plan.

5. Practice implementing a care plan as an interprofessional team.

Title

Fundamentals of Critical Care Support (FCCS) Certification: An Interprofessional Training

Description
The Fundamentals of Critical Care Support (FCCS) objectives are designed to prepare non-intensivisits to manage critically ill patients for the first 24 hours or until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged. The course focuses on managing the sudden deterioration of critically ill patients and prepares the interprofessional house staff and nurses for ICU coverage. Approximately 40-50 Adult-Gero Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AGACNP) students will take the FCCS course during their last clinical practicum semester. The course consists of pre-course learning that involves reading and viewing of certain lectures. Students then attend a two day course where there is a combination of didactic, simulation, and case-based scenario learning with skills check-offs and assessment of knowledge acquisition. Resources include the use of the SimLife center, interprofessional providers such as respiratory therapists and physicians, and current AGACNP faculty. The course is designed to teach the management of the critically ill patient utilizing appropriate and effective teamwork and communication with all available professions.

IPE will be integrated into the FCCS course in the following ways:

1. During the skills lab sessions and simulation component of the FCCS course, AGACNP students will be teamed with respiratory therapists and/or physicians to identify significant changes in the unstable patient. Together, they will collaborate to develop a plan of care for the patient and work to implement the plan of care based on their scope of practice and available equipment.

2. During the team-based case scenario learning stations and the simulation-based activities with ventilator and oxygen management, the AGACNP students will work to communicate and prioritize the needs of the critically ill patient through discussion of profession-specific priorities, roles and responsibilities of each profession, and how interprofessional teamwork provides the foundation for patient-centered care. The AGACNP students will work with either the physicians and/or respiratory therapists to collaboratively problem-solve the issue with the patient and perform interventions that utilize the best available care from each of the professions present.

3. Effective team communication tools and strategies will be targeted and reinforced during simulation and case-based scenarios to recognize and initiate management of the critically ill patient. Using DIRECT methodology, participants are instructed to communicate their perspective and assessment to others on the team, so that time-sensitive and critical tasks are not missed and can be completed expertly and promptly. The role, responsibility and scope of practice for multiple healthcare professionals will be addressed to determine the need for expert consultation, further intervention, and/or patient transfer. Foundations of collaborative practice will be targeted during debrief and feedback sessions with each team-based group.

Title

Resiliency in Interprofessional Teamwork: An Interprofessional Virtual Small-Group Activity

Description
Burnout in healthcare and healthcare education is an epidemic that has been linked to numerous devastating outcomes for learners, professionals, and patients. Many national healthcare organizations have stated that teamwork and mutual support are critical to improving resilience and well-being. Therefore, supporting and building the resiliency and well-being of teams is essential. It benefits not only the individual members of those teams but also those who are served by and engaged with the team. Additionally, as interprofessional teams are becoming increasingly important in health care delivery, the benefits of interprofessional collaboration are becoming more apparent and can lead to improved morale, decreased burnout, and increased patient safety. The purpose of this virtual IPE small group event is to discuss and reflect on the reciprocal relationship between teamwork and individual/team resiliency. Interprofessional small groups will also discuss team and individual strategies/tools to build resiliency, which is necessary to prevent burnout.

Interprofessional education and collaborative practice will be addressed throughout the event. Event outline includes:
1. Event Brief
2. Keynote presentation - resiliency and teamwork topics
3. Interprofessional small group discussion – interprofessional teams of 10-12 learners will discuss resiliency and teamwork from a list of group discussion questions. Students will then develop a list of at least 5 team/individual resilience goals and strategies/tools to reach each goal.
4. Facilitated debrief – interprofessional teams will complete a facilitated debrief to reflect on learning objectives and team functioning.
5. Learner assessment – learners will complete a post-event survey.

Student learning objectives for this event include:
• Identify areas of personal strength and opportunities for growth.
• Identify and discuss factors that contribute to improved resilience and emotional wellness that benefit individual and team performance.
• Discuss teamwork and accountability and share how teams can support each other while ensuring high standards of patient care.
• Reflect on values that inspire high standards of professional and ethical behavior as it relates to emotional wellness in individuals and teams.


Title

The 8-hour SIM Day: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
A key component of today’s healthcare education is interprofessional education simulations. Interprofessional education (IPE) simulations can help to clarify roles and responsibilities of team members, increase students’ interprofessional communication skills, allow students to practice functioning as a team, and instill the values/ethics of collaborative care. These types of IPE simulations allow students to work on unfolding cases where a patient’s condition changes and progresses over time. These real-life immersion experiences allow students to interact with other health professions by communicating patient needs, providing patient updates, interpreting lab results, and communicating and directing patient-centered care. All students in healthcare-related professions should know how to appropriately and successfully communicate with other health professions, as well as have the skills to function as a successful members of the healthcare team. To this end, the TTUHSC School of Nursing developed a hospital-based IPE simulation for the TTUHSC BSN Traditional Undergraduate (TUG) Program on the Lubbock, Abilene, Odessa, Amarillo and Mansfield campuses.

The “8-hour SIM Day” is an IPE simulation that allows nursing students to prioritize patient centered collaborative care, adhere to a simulated nursing schedule, utilize critical thinking to make decisions, function as an interprofessional team member, clarify roles and responsibilities of the team, and communicate effectively with interprofessional team members. At the beginning of the IPE simulation, each nursing student is paired with a standardized patient for whom they will provide coordinated care across the 8 hours duration of the simulation. The composition of the student’s healthcare team for their specific standardized patient varies campus-to-campus based on the availability of professions on each campus.

The interprofessional team on the Lubbock campus includes nursing students, medical students, and graduate speech-language pathology students. The Abilene campus previously included TTUHSC nursing students, Abilene Christian University (ACU) graduate occupational therapy students, and ACU graduate speech-language pathology student. However, at this time they watch a recorded video encounter of the IPE experience between nursing and speech-language pathology students. The same thing occurs on the Amarillo, Odessa, and Mansfield campuses until we are able to collaborate with other Interprofessional teams to join for this experience.

Throughout the simulation, students practice interprofessional communication and teamwork skills to improve quality and safe patient-centered care, as well as patient satisfaction with care. After the simulation, a debriefing session is completed and is a requirement for nursing students. Interprofessional team members are encouraged to attend as schedules allow. Students discuss the simulation based on completeness, efficiency, and effectiveness of collaborative care. Students reflect on the roles and responsibilities of each team member, use of standard interprofessional communication tools, and success of the team to deliver quality care.

Title

Interprofessional Orthotic and Prosthetic Seminar (IOPS): A Set of Interprofessional Workshops

Description
The Interprofessional Orthotic and Prosthetic Seminar (IOPS) implements a healthcare team including: Orthotist, Prosthetist, Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, and Athletic Trainer to bring hands on clinical training to doctor of physical therapy students. The physical therapy students will have breakout sessions teaching on: sports braces, lower extremity orthotics for adults and pediatrics, prosthetics components and residual limb care, and upper extremity splinting. They will have one hour of UE splinting, and six other 30 minute breakout sessions with case scenarios of when products used and time to clinically work with products. Occupational therapy students will be teaching assistants during the seminar, but will have a full hour to see a few breakout sessions as well. The IOPS is a 4.25 hour event that is part of the DPT course HPPT 8226. At the end of the seminar a 15 minute discussion and feedback time will occur with all students and presenters. A facilitator will ask questions about content learned and application across the PT and OT field of practice. 1. During the beginning each breakout sessions, facilitators will define roles for health professionals related to the prosthetics or orthotics during that session. At the conclusion of each breakout session facilitators will address the need for teamwork and communication across health care professionals dealing with the orthotics or prosthetics. 2. During the conclusion, all students will be together for a wrap of learning that occurred throughout the day. In addition, a time of facilitator led discussion on how interprofessional communication is needed with orthotics and prosthetics. 3. Following the event, a student survey for PT and OT students will be given to assess interprofessional practice and education related to the IOPS. Below is a list of the breakout sessions: • One breakout session will include a TTUHSC Occupational Therapist professor explaining the roles of OT vs PT with upper extremity splinting. Then the OT professor and OT students will do a psychomotor lab to let the PT students make a thumb spica splint. During this time the PT and OT students are assigned the task of comparing their curriculum in regards to orthotics. The PT students will be broken up into groups of four. All groups will have one full hour to work on this breakout session with the OT professor and students. The OT students are allowed time to go to two breakout sessions of their chose. This will allow them to see a lower extremity orthotic or prosthetic. Then later the OT student will have to reflect the correlation of that breakout session to their practice. • One breakout session will be a TTUHSC Physical Therapy professor demonstrating in a lab setting how to stump wrap a residual limb, use of shrinkers, and prosthetic components. Students will use positive mold residual limbs to practice the techniques. Application will be discussed as to why OT and PT students need to k

Title

Acute Care Skill Development for Patient Safety: An Interprofessional Simulation with Standardized Patients

Description
The acute care scope of practice for occupational therapy and speech-language pathology challenges many novice clinicians when patients with complex medical needs require services in the intricate physical and technical environment of an acute care setting. This clinical challenge aligns well with the patient-safety mission of simulated learning environments where training can prevent mistakes in clinical decision-making or procedural skills that have critical consequences. The purpose of this simulation with standardized patients (SPs) is to provide students from occupational therapy and speech-language pathology an opportunity to practice teaching and learning acute care performance skills and critical thinking related to transfers, management of medical equipment, and oral hygiene in an interprofessional environment. Through IPE team training, students will educate each other on clinical procedures, as well as practice communication, teamwork, values & ethics for collaborative care, and patient-centered care to improve the quality of clinical interactions.

Learners from occupational therapy and speech-language pathology will collaborate to team-teach acute care skills, review roles & responsibilities, discuss strategies to improve patient safety, and belonging on an interprofessional collaborative practice healthcare team. Learners will then complete a series of simulation scenarios serving as the SP and clinician. Additionally, students may also have the opportunity to serve in the observer/scribe role and be tasked with giving constructive feedback to participants on the accuracy and quality of their participation. During the simulation debrief, learners will discuss simulation performance and identify ways to improve patient-centered care and safety through collaborative practice.

The objectives of this acute care simulation with SPs are:
1. Communicate effectively, recognizing the needs, values, and cultural/linguistic background of the client
2. Support client completion of oral care in a safe and effective manner.
3. Manage medical equipment in a safe and effective manner.
4. Assist client in transfer from bed to a wheelchair in a safe and effective manner.
5. Accurately utilize Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and infection control procedures to maximize the safety of both client and healthcare professional.

Title

Designing Collaborative Care Facilities: An Interprofessional Didactic Project

Description
Student engagement involving multiple professions is a key element in the future of designing healthcare facilities that will support collaborative care. One of the most important service delivery models — collaborative care — is highlighted in the Institute for Medicine's list of 20 national priorities for improving healthcare. Collaborative care, however, has not been widely practiced in the healthcare industry except at university-affiliated teaching hospitals and medical centers. This interprofessional small group didactic project will allow students the opportunity to design the deliberate organization of patient care activities between two or more professions involved in a patient's care, including the patient, to facilitate the appropriate delivery of healthcare services. Organizing care and designing spaces with the intention of collaborative care is a way to accelerate collaboration, instill student excitement, and facilitate "buy-in" on the most appropriate facility design that will support collaborative care.

Despite all of the challenges of designing a collaborative care environment, the collaborative approach is a transparent process that enables a variety of professions to speak a parallel language focusing on facility design and oversight in healthcare excellence. Developing a new healthcare facility, using an approach like collaborative care design, requires knowledge of roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, and team communication strategies. By working together, students from different professions can develop well-thought-out goals, objectives and metrics, freely sharing knowledge and real-life lessons and experiences, the result will be a beneficial healthcare environment where a collaborative care team delivers consistent, positive outcomes in patient care.

As part of a business management course, Master's of Occupational Therapy and Doctor of Physical Therapy students will work together in small teams of 6-8 students to design a collaborative care practice. Students will be responsible for developing a Facility Plan, Organizational Plan, Financial Plan and a Marketing Plan for a new collaborative care practice that features, but is not limited to, the professions of occupational therapy and physical therapy. In addition to collaborative care healthcare design, students will have to use core IPE competencies of teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and team communication to work as an interprofessional team to design the new healthcare facility.

Title

Future Healthcare Professionals' Experience Trauma Drama: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
The Trauma Drama is a dynamic and innovative Interprofessional Education (IPE) activity designed to foster collaboration among various health professions. As a key component of Interprofessional practice, the Trauma Drama brings together students from the fields of research, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, health professions, and population and public health to collaboratively write a script and develop a play focused on the delivery of team-based care. This unique initiative is featured as part of the Future Healthcare Professionals' Experience (FHPE), an annual event hosted by the TTUHSC Office of Student Life. Prior to writing the play, the interprofessional team of learners engages in a briefing session where they discuss the play's purpose, the role of team-based care, and the importance of teamwork not only in portraying roles but also in the play's creation and practice. Guided by mentors, the teams then write, rehearse, and refine the drama. The culmination is a live performance for high school students. Post-performance, the team of learners participates in a facilitated debrief, exploring the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) Core Competencies, reflecting on team engagement, and contemplating how this experience might reshape future collaborations. To measure the impact of the Trauma Drama, learners complete a standardized tool gauging their perceptions of Interprofessional Education, ensuring a comprehensive evaluation of the activity's efficacy in promoting collaborative practice.

Title

Fostering an Organizational Culture of Teamwork: An Interprofessional Didactic Project

Description
Organizational characteristics, such as organizational culture, are important aspects for interprofessional teamwork, quality of care, and patient outcomes. Studies have demonstrated that interprofessional teamwork is influenced by organizational culture. Further studies have shown that teamwork predicts job satisfaction. In fact, organizational culture is often considered as the precondition of teamwork in the healthcare setting. Several studies have shown the effects of interprofessional teamwork on outcome criteria on the patient/family, employee/staff, and organization domains. On the patient/family domain, high quality teamwork is linked with higher patient satisfaction ratings and compliance, improved quality of treatment, improved patient safety and better clinical outcomes. On the employee/staff domain, high quality teamwork is linked to higher job satisfaction, greater well-being, improved mental health, better team climate, and increased team efficiency. On the organization level, high quality teamwork is associated with cost savings, higher workforce retention, and reduced employee turnover. The aim of this interprofessional didactic activity is to target concepts of organizational characteristics, including teamwork, employee motivation, and employee retention, which lead to improved patient, employee, and organizational outcomes.

The activity will be a course assignment within one of the Master of Science in Healthcare Administration (MSHA) core courses, HPHA 5307: Human Resources Management. The Master of Science in Healthcare Administration is a fully online graduate healthcare administration degree geared towards working healthcare professionals who are seeking to obtain the skills and knowledge necessary to advance as a successful healthcare leader. Because the MSHA program is for working healthcare professionals, students are from a wide variety of clinical backgrounds. A student cohort will typically include the following professions: healthcare administration, nurses, physicians, physician assistants, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, medical technologists, radiology technologists, speech therapists, emergency medical professionals, and others.

During this didactic activity, students will be divided into interprofessional groups of six or seven, with various professions represented in each group. The activity will consist of the group responding to a scenario-based case study concerning employee motivation and turnover in a hospital setting. The group will interact as a committee formed to discuss this issue for each of their respective professions, as well as for the group and organization as a whole. The group will prepare a report discussing this issue, how it relates to each of their professions, and the formulation and implementation of a strategy or strategies to address the issue. The students in each group will communicate via discussion forums. Each group member will be provided Interprofessional team strategies to help them to have a better understanding of how to effectively work in a collaborative team environment. There will be a high level of interactivity among group members within the forum. The group paper will discuss each of the professions and will be a learning activity that they work on and complete together. Another aspect of the assignment requires each student to summarize what they learned through this project, what they learned about the other professions represented, and also what they learned about working in collaboration with an interprofessional team.

The learning objectives for this activity and assignment are that at the end of the assignment, students will be able to:
• Discuss the importance of employee motivation and empowerment
• Describe the challenges faced by various health professions in regard to employee motivation and turnover
• Discuss the importance and benefits of working in an Interprofessional collaborative group

Title

Hearing Screening Skill Development for SLP & AUD Learners: An Interprofessional Simulation Experience

Description
In the ever-evolving field of communication sciences and disorders, speech-language pathology, and audiology, the ability to conduct thorough hearing screenings is of paramount importance. These screenings are not only a fundamental aspect of identifying and addressing communication disorders but also serve as a critical initial step in the diagnostic and treatment process for individuals of all ages. Equally essential is the collaboration between speech-language pathology and audiology students, who must work together to refine their skills in hearing screening. Given the sensitive nature of hearing assessments and the potential consequences of misdiagnoses, creating a safe and controlled learning environment for simulation exercises is invaluable. Such simulations offer aspiring professionals the opportunity to practice this vital skill under supervision, ensuring that they are well-prepared to provide the highest quality care and support to individuals with communication challenges. This collaborative approach between speech-language pathology and audiology students not only fosters essential skills but also promotes a holistic and integrated approach to patient care.

All learners will participate in a simulation brief to learn best practices in hearing screenings for people of all ages. Foundations of communication and collaboration between these 2 professions will also be discussed. Learners will have the opportunity to learn roles and responsibilities, teamwork, and collaboration. Students from the audiology program will serve as standardized patients for student clinicians from the SLP program conducting hearing screenings and educating on results/recommendations for eight different patient presentation scenarios.

SLP Student Learning Objectives include:
• Demonstrate knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the ear. This includes understanding the structures of the ear, how sound travels through the ear, and how the ear converts sound waves into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.
• Gain experience in conducting hearing screenings. This includes learning how to set up and operate the equipment, how to administer the tests, and how to interpret the results.
• Educate and counsel clients and care partners regarding results and recommendations. This includes using person-centered communication to explain anatomy, physiology, results, possible referrals, and resources.
• Increase confidence in conducting hearing screenings. The simulation activity can provide a safe and controlled environment for students to practice their skills and gain confidence in their ability to conduct hearing screenings.

Audiology Student Learning Objectives include:
• serve in a mentorship role providing explicit and constructive feedback to maximize SLP students’ performance.
• work collaboratively with SLP students developing teamwork and clear communication skills with other professionals.
• differentiate roles and responsibilities in hearing screening in the scope of practice between disciplines

Following the simulation learners will have an opportunity to reflect on both clinical skills and teamwork skills in a large group debrief.

Title

Texas Tech Memory Screening Day: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Event

Description
Interprofessional collaborative care is a strategic component of many community engagement activities. Community engagement provides the opportunity for interprofessional learning, as interprofessional teams of students work side-by-side to respond to challenges faced by communities. Interprofessional community engagement activities provide students with knowledge about the community (including assets within the community), as well as allow students to develop trusting collaborative care relationships, learn about social determinants of health, be flexible, and foster a long-term commitment to staying engaged in the community. Interprofessional
community engagement learning experiences also have the potential to increase students’ comfort in developing relationships with patients and families from different cultures and who have different lifestyles and socialization. Students from TTUHSC SOM, SON, and SOP will be working together at the Texas Tech Memory Screening Day located at Amarillo TT Internal Medicine clinic.

This interprofessional community engagement event is structured as follows:
1. Interprofessional pre-event briefing: Prior to the event, students will participate in an event briefing to go over team assignments, roles and responsibilities, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics for collaborative care related to the elderly patient population.
2. Interprofessional community engagement event: The students will be paired up with a student from another profession to do the following activity with older adults from the community:
a) Memory screening (SLUMS)
3. Feedback and survey: Following the event, students complete a feedback sheet and an interprofessional education survey of questions related to interprofessional practice and education and feedback on the event.

Objectives:
1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of healthcare professionals participating in a community engagement event for the elderly.
2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional community engagement event.

Title

Lubbock Free Clinic (Impact Clinic): An Interprofessional Collaborative Care Clinic

Description
The Lubbock Free Clinic (Impact Clinic) is a community-based urgent care clinic that seeks to provide free basic healthcare to the working poor and homeless population of Lubbock. In addition to the student-run free clinic, there is also a Class D Pharmacy, which is managed by one of the pharmacy residents from the School of Pharmacy. The student-run free clinic was developed as both a clinical and an educational initiative, with the dual goals of improving health care access for medically underserved populations, as well as increasing students’ interprofessional competence, knowledge, understanding, and respect for collaborative practice. The Lubbock Free Clinic operates every Wednesday from 6pm to 10pm, or until the last patient is seen. Student volunteers participate in the clinic each week. Students volunteers represent a wide variety of professions including audiology, medicine, nursing (graduate and doctoral level), occupational therapy, physical therapy, pharmacy, and speech-language pathology. Interprofessional practice and education is targeted during a pre-clinic huddle and during team collaboration throughout the clinic. The pre-clinic huddle includes introductions, discussion of roles and responsibilities of each profession, and discussion of interprofessional collaborative practice. Students have the opportunity to ask questions of other students, providers, and preceptors regarding roles and responsibilities and team-based care. Next, the interprofessional team conducts chart reviews for their assigned patient group. While staffing the patients, each profession has the opportunity to discuss areas of concern and the team determines the best course of action for addressing concerns. Patients are seen by interprofessional teams of students once the chart review is completed. The team discusses patient recommendations from a variety of perspectives and the team comes up with a collaborative plan of care, which is then discussed with the patient. Following the clinic, students complete a facilitated debrief to discuss team performance, roles & responsibilities, leadership, communication, and values/ethics for interprofessional care.

Title

Roles and Responsibilities of the Clinical Laboratory Scientist within the Health Care Team: A Didactic Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
One objective of this IPE learning activity is to emphasize the roles and responsibilities of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) within the health care team. The second objective is to highlight the importance of interprofessional communication between CLS and other members of the health care team for improved patient care. The objectives for this IPE learning activity are accomplished through three components associated with this IPE learning activity. This activity will be included in the curriculum of the Traditional CLS Program, the Second Degree Program, and the Certificate Program. Slight modifications to the project were made to accommodate the students in the online CLS programs (second degree and certificate)

Students in the Traditional CLS Program will complete the project as follows:

1. Student Perceptions: As part of a junior level didactic course, CLS students are placed in small groups of 4 or 5 students. Each small group must select a novel healthcare profession and complete a survey to determine the group's preconceived notions of that professional's role within the health care team. The students are also asked how they think that health care professional interacts with lab professionals.
2. Structured Interprofessional Interview with a Health Care Professional: The small group then conducts an interview with a the selected healthcare professional from Activity 1. The interprofessional interview contains questions about roles and responsibilities of the other health care professional, perceived roles and responsibilities of a CLS, methods of effective team communication, and how the other professional interacts or is impacted by lab professionals.
3. Small Group Presentation: Each small group must prepare a 10-15 minute presentation over their selected health care profession, research they have done on this profession, the group's initial perceptions of the profession, and the results of the interprofessional interview. During the presentation, the small groups will discuss whether or not their initial perceptions changed after the interview and if/how the interview changed their understanding and appreciation for the other health care profession. The presentation will also emphasize how teamwork between the two professions could improve team-based care. Each presentation will be as an informative mini-seminar to their fellow classmates followed by an interactive discussion about the profession and opportunities for collaborative practice with the other health care profession. The course professor will facilitate the student-driven discussions.

Students in the Second Degree and Certificate Programs will complete the project as follows:

1. Student Perceptions: As part of the summer Seminar course for the online second degree and CLS certificate program, CLS students are assigned an individual interprofessional interview activity. Each student must select a novel healthcare profession and complete a survey to determine their preconceived notions of that professional's role within the health care team. The students are also asked how they think that health care professional interacts with lab professionals.
2. Structured interprofessional Interview with a Health Care Professional: The student then conducts an interview with the selected healthcare professional from Activity 1. The interprofessional interview contains questions about roles and responsibilities of the other health care professional, perceived roles and responsibilities of a CLS, methods of effective team communication, and how the other professional interacts or is impacted by lab professionals.
3. Presentation: Each student must prepare a 10-15 minute presentation over their selected health care profession, research they have done on this profession, the group's initial perceptions of the profession, and the results of the interprofessional interview. During the presentation, the student will discuss whether or not their initial perceptions changed after the interview and if/how the interview changed their understanding and appreciation for the other health care profession. The presentation will also emphasize how teamwork between the two professions could improve team-based care. The presentation will serve as an informative mini-seminar to their fellow instructors and preceptorship coordinator followed by an interactive discussion about the profession and opportunities for collaborative practice with the other health care profession. The preceptorship coordinator will facilitate the student-driven discussions.

Title

Pediatric Fundamentals of Critical Care Support: An Interprofessional Simulation Experience

Description
Pediatric Fundamental Critical Care Support (PFCCS) trains nonintensivists to recognize critical illness and initiate care for critically ill pediatric patients and is recommended for any healthcare professional who may encounter a critically ill or injured pediatric patient. The course addresses fundamental management principles for the first 24 hours of post-resuscitation management of the critically ill pediatric patient or until transfer or appropriate critical care consultation can be arranged.

Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (PNP-AC) students will take the PFCCS course during their last clinical practicum semester. The course consists of recourse learning that involves reading and viewing of lectures. Students then attend a 1 day intensive - where there is a combination of didactic, simulation, and case-based scenario learning with skills checkoffs and assessment of knowledge acquisition.

Resources include the use of the SimLife center, interprofessional providers such as respiratory therapists, nurses, and physicians, and current PNP-AC faculty. The course is designed to teach the management of critically ill patients by utilizing appropriate and effective teamwork and communication with all available professionals.

IPE will be integrated into the FCCS course in the following ways:

1. During the skills lab sessions and simulation component of the FPCCS course, PNP-AC students will be teamed with respiratory therapists, physicians, and nurses to identify significant changes in the unstable patient. Together, they will collaborate to develop a plan of care for the patient and work to implement the plan of care based
on their scope of practice and available equipment.
2. During the team-based case scenario learning stations and the simulation-based activities with ventilator and oxygen management, the PNP-AC students will work to communicate and prioritize the needs of the critically ill patient through discussion of profession-specific priorities, roles and responsibilities of each profession, and how interprofessional teamwork provides the foundation for patient-centered care. The PNP-AC students will work with either the physicians and/or respiratory therapists to collaboratively problem-solve the issue with the patient and perform interventions that utilize the best available care from each of the professions present.
3. Effective team communication tools and strategies will be targeted and reinforced during simulation and case-based scenarios to recognize and initiate the management of critically ill patients. Using crisis resource management, participants are instructed to communicate their perspectives and assessments to others on the team, so that time-sensitive and critical tasks are not missed and can be completed expertly and promptly. The role, responsibility, and scope of practice for multiple healthcare professionals will be addressed to determine the need for expert consultation, further intervention, and/or patient transfer. Foundations of a collaborative approach will be targeted during debriefing and feedback sessions with each team-based group.

Title

Community Health Fair: An Interprofessional Community Engagement Event

Description
Interprofessional collaborative care is a strategic component of many community engagement activities. Community engagement provides the opportunity for interprofessional learning, as interprofessional teams of students work side-by-side to respond to challenges faced by communities. Interprofessional community engagement activities provide students with knowledge about the community (including assets within the community), as well as allow students to develop trusting collaborative care relationships, learn about social determinants of health, be flexible, and foster a long-term commitment to staying engaged in the community. Interprofessional community engagement learning experiences also have the potential to increase students’ comfort in developing relationships with patients and families from different cultures and who have different lifestyles and socialization.

The schools of pharmacy, veterinary medicine, medicine, and nursing in Amarillo are collaborating to provide a health fair to serve the needs of homeless individuals in the community. Students from the vet school will provide physical exams and vaccines for patients' dogs. Students from the school of pharmacy, nursing, and medicine will provide health screenings and immunizations for patients. Approximately 10 students from each discipline will be involved. The goal of this learning experience is for these health professions students to work collaboratively to serve the needs of an underserved population in our community. Through this experience, they will gain a greater understanding and appreciation for each other's roles and the importance of interprofessional communication in coordinating a large community.

This interprofessional community engagement event is structured as follows:

1. Interprofessional pre-event huddle: During the huddle, students will go over team assignments, roles and responsibilities, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics related to the patient population. Students will then work together to prepare their screening booth and plan with their team.
2. Interprofessional community engagement event: Interprofessional teams of students will be stationed in various booths. Interprofessional student teams will administer a wide range of health screenings, counsel patients/families on the results of the screenings and give recommendations and information about additional resources, and provide health education related to prevention and safety.
3. Feedback and survey: Following the event, students will participate in a facilitated debrief with peer feedback and discuss reflection questions related to interprofessional practice and education.

Objectives:
1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of healthcare professionals participating in a community engagement event.
2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional community engagement event.

Title

Prevention of Medication Errors from a Healthcare Management Perspective: An Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
Medication errors are one of the leading causes of adverse patient incidents in health care settings and often result in medical malpractice cases. As such, medication safety is a concern and interprofessional education is vital for preparing healthcare administration students for their roles as clinical department leaders and well as general administrative leaders that set safety, budgetary, and culture standards that can mitigate medication errors. Knowing about and valuing the skills and responsibilities of other team members and respecting each person's role in the team leads to more effective communication and collaboration in the context of medication safety. The purpose of this project is to offer management students in the BSHM program a opportunity to become familiar with a patient's healthcare team, including pharmacists and others that may be involved in the medication care-giving chain. The Healthcare Management Program (BSHM) is an on-line Bachelor of Science degree that prepares the student to enter management and leadership positions within healthcare organizations. Emphasis is placed on relating the knowledge and skills to real-world applications in healthcare settings. Through an interprofessional interview with a pharmacist or other care-giving chain member (e.g. nurse, nurse aide, physician, etc) BSHM students will better understand their professional roles and those of others around the theme of medication safety and prevention of medication errors.

This didactic IPE learning activity has the following components:

1. Interprofessional Mini-Series: Students will watch an interprofessional mini-series. Currently, two interprofessional mini-series have been developed at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center. Each interprofessional mini-series promotes leadership and professional development in the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) “core” competency domains including (1) roles and responsibilities, (2) interprofessional communication, (3) values/ethics, and (4) teams and teamwork. The interprofessional mini-series serves to provide an IPE learning platform for students in preparation for collaborative care experiences on clinical rotation. The interprofessional mini-series includes high definition videos arranged in 12 individual learning episodes, as well as a single feature film. The 12 episodes depict both ideal and dramatized interprofessional and student/preceptor interactions, followed by educational commentary. Each episode is designed to include entertainment, student/preceptor scenarios, student/preceptor expert commentary, and student/preceptor learning pearls.

a. The Reason I Jump: An Interprofessional Mini-Series: This interprofessional mini-series includes the professions of occupational therapy, nursing, medicine, pharmacy, athletic training, emergency medical services, and speech-language pathology. The trailer for The Reason I Jump: An Interprofessional Mini-Series can be viewed at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdAUqjjzRLM.
b. Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series: This interprofessional mini-series includes the professions of nursing, pharmacy, medicine, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology. The trailer for Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1i79XDQHB4.

2. Interprofessional Interview: After viewing the mini-series, students will select a healthcare professional to interview about their roles and responsibilities in medication safety and reporting medication errors. Students will then develop a set of interview questions for the healthcare professions. Students will then interview a health care professional, such as a pharmacist or other pertinent clinical role, in their community utilizing a set of content questions, as well as questions about role's and responsibilities and communication strategies concerning mitigating medication errors.
Sample interview questions could include:
a. What other disciplines does the pharmacist (or other relevant caregiver) interact with on a daily basis?
b. How does this caregiver interact with these other disciplines? Include at least two examples.
c. What common medication errors are seen in the pharmacy or elsewhere?
d. What is the process of reporting a medication error? Is it efficient and effective?
e. What strategies are in place to prevent medication errors?
f. What kind of education is provided to pharmacists or relevant patient care staff regarding new medications?

3. Discussion Forum: Students will then reflect upon the answers given during the interview and present them in a discussion forum. Student will reflect on both the content of the interview relevant to preventing medication errors, as well as on collaborative care, teamwork, and communication strategies necessary to prevent errors.

Learning objectives:
1. Students will describe a health professional's and organization’s responsibility in the prevention of medication errors.
2. Students will give examples of the importance of written and verbal communication with other professionals in the prevention and reporting of medication errors.
3. Students will illustrate that teamwork and collaborative care are essential skills in medication safety and prevention of errors.
4. Students will generate a plan for their role as a leader to support a culture of safety in their organization.


Title

National Rural Health Day: An Interprofessional Small Group Experience

Description
Rural communities are wonderful places to live and work, which is why nearly 61 million people – call them home. These small towns, farming communities, and frontier areas are places where neighbors know each other, listen to each other, respect each other, and work together to benefit the greater good. Research shows that graduates of healthcare education schools with a rural health mission are more likely to choose to work in rural primary care healthcare settings. By adopting a rural health focus, TTUHSC provides opportunities for students to learn about and practice in rural health settings. National Rural Health Day Celebration and Recruitment Fair is hosted by TTUHSC and the Texas State Office of Rural Health to showcase the opportunities and resources available to healthcare teams in rural settings. During this celebration, learners will have an opportunity to engage with a wide variety of rural healthcare professions, clinical partners, community resources, and more. To receive IPE credit, learners will be briefed on the types of activities and resources that are available throughout the celebration and fair. Learners must actively engage with a variety of professionals at each resource booth and activity and ask questions about the roles & responsibilities and teamwork/collaboration in rural health communities. Learners will have a check-off sheet that will have to be stamped by each of the professionals following the interactions. At the end of the event, learners will complete a post-event survey focused on teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and communication in rural health settings. Students will then have to write a reflection on 2 things they learned about another profession and 2 ways healthcare professionals can better collaborate and communicate in rural communities.

Title

Unlocking Success - Best Practices in Interprofessional Collaboration: An Interprofessional Small Group Discussion Series

Description
This small group discussion series is designed to empower learners from various healthcare fields with the knowledge and skills needed to excel in interprofessional collaboration. This series, conducted over multiple sessions, delves into the essential principles and strategies for fostering effective teamwork and cooperation among individuals from diverse backgrounds and disciplines.

Topics include:
Understanding Interprofessional Collaboration
Building Effective Communication
Establishing Team Roles and Responsibilities
Conflict Resolution and Decision-Making
Improving care team well-being and belonging

Interprofessional small groups of learners will have a facilitated discussion on best practices in collaboration. At the end of the event, learners will complete a post-event survey. Capstone students in the Office of Interprofessional Education will develop topics for the discussion.

Title

Healthcare Administration Capstone: An Interprofessional Didactic Project

Description
The Healthcare Administration Capstone course (HPHA 5314) is the final course in the Master of Science in Healthcare Administration (MSHA) program. The intent of the course is for students to combine knowledge that they have gained from the program, along with research conducted through literature reviews and potentially interprofessional interviews, to propose team-based recommendations and solutions related to a healthcare issue or problem. Students that choose to incorporate an interprofessional and collaborative care theme into their capstone project, are able to count the capstone as an IPE learning activity.

Interprofessional education would be targeted in the healthcare administration capstone project in the following ways:

1. Students would identify a healthcare issue or problem and complete a literature review.
2. The student would conduct structured interviews with at least 3 different healthcare professionals to ask about experience with the healthcare issue, as well as inquire about interprofessional and team-based solutions.
3. In the capstone paper, the student must research and identify how collaborative care and team-based solutions could greatly impact the healthcare issue.

Title

Embracing Cultural Humility in Collaborative Practice: An Interprofessional Simulation

Description
Numerous studies have shown that when organizations provide an opportunity that fosters collaboration and interprofessional education, then team cohesiveness improves. What has not been widely explored is the impact of those same exercises and their potential influence on learning and understanding social determinants of health and cultural humility. The purpose of the interprofessional (IP) simulation is to immerse interprofessional teams of students in “a day in the life” of a healthcare professional working on a medical-surgical floor or Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Students from TTUHSC nursing and pharmacy as well as social work, occupational therapy, and speech therapy students from Abilene Christian University collaborate to deliver high-quality and safe patient-centered care as members of an interprofessional team. The simulation design includes 22 evidence-based scenarios ranging in acuity level from "walk-in" clinic diagnoses such as hypertension to med-surg diagnoses such as breast cancer. The simulation scenarios focus on social determinants of health and cultural humility. First and second-semester junior nursing students are assigned to work together in teams and are allocated to either the med-surg floor or the FQHC to collaborate with other professionals on all aspects of patient care. Standardized patients and high-fidelity manikins depict the roles of patients and family members. A structured, one-hour debrief session follows the simulation. Huddles and debriefs are also provided throughout the scenarios, as needed. During huddle and debrief sessions, interprofessional education discussion topics include values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, teamwork, and interprofessional communication tools.

Feedback and survey: Prior to and following the event, students complete a feedback sheet and complete an interprofessional education survey related to interprofessional practice and education.

Objectives:
1. Understand the roles and responsibilities of a variety of healthcare professionals participating in a community engagement event.
2. Participate as a team member in an interprofessional event.

Title

Medicine on the Move: An Interprofessional Collaborative Care Mobile Clinic

Description
The U.S. healthcare system is often described as failing to achieve optimal health outcomes while generating excessive costs for patients, payors, and society. Mobile clinics and units offer flexible and viable options for treating isolated and vulnerable groups of patients while reducing the cost of care and advancing health equity. Mobile care units also create a collaborative care solution to improve the way patients and care teams communicate and coordinate care.

Medicine on the Move is a mobile health initiative of Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - Permian Basin. This program features two mobile units focusing on services like Community engagement, health screenings, health education, the Texas vaccines for Children program, Primary Health care, and Telemedicine clinics.

During this collaborative care experience, interprofessional education is targeted during a pre-clinic huddle and throughout the team collaborative care mobile clinic visits. The pre-clinic huddle includes introductions, a discussion of the roles and responsibilities of each profession, and a discussion of interprofessional collaborative practice. Learners have the opportunity to ask questions of other learners, licensed healthcare professionals, providers, and preceptors regarding roles and responsibilities and team-based care. Next, patients are seen by interprofessional teams and the team discusses patient recommendations from a variety of perspectives to come up with a collaborative plan of care, which is then discussed with the patient. Following the clinic, students complete a facilitated debrief to discuss team performance, roles & responsibilities, leadership, communication, and values/ethics for interprofessional care.

Title

Creating Healthy Rural Health Communities: An Interprofessional Case-Based Learning Activity

Description
Collaboration and teamwork are absolutely essential to quality healthcare in rural communities. Rural healthcare teams also face several challenges, including shortages of healthcare professionals, cultural incongruence, and increasing patient populations with poor health behaviors, chronic health conditions, and low socioeconomic status. Additionally, communication among healthcare professionals team and with communities and community resources is critical for access to care, cost of care, and health equity. This interprofessional education activity will allow teams of learners to increase their awareness of the different health disciplines/programs present on the TTUHSC- Permian Basin campus. Teams of learners will then complete a case study, which will focus on Rural Healthcare and the provision of healthcare in underresourced rural settings. Collaboration, Communication, Teamwork, Roles & Responsibilities, and Values/Ethics reflection questions will be incorporated into the case study. At the end of the event, interprofessional teams will debrief together with facilitators/instructors to discuss recommendations and resources for patients in rural communities.

Title

Student Research Week: An Interprofessional Interview, Panel Discussion, and Case Study

Description
Every year, students in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (GSBS) at Texas Tech University Health Sciences (TTUHSC) host Student Research Week (SRW). SRW is an engaging event where students from various schools have the opportunity to showcase their research, collaborate together, and engage with keynote speakers throughout the week. SRW is held annually in March on the Lubbock campus.

During SRW, students are offered the opportunity to participate in an IPE learning activity that includes interprofessional interviews with poster presenters, an interprofessional panel discussion, and a small group case study discussion. To receive IPE credit, students will participate in all three interprofessional education SRW activities.

1. Interprofessional interviews with poster presenters: Students are required to interact with students from other schools to get a basic understanding of the research other professions conduct, as well as the roles and responsibilities of the other profession. Students are required to interview at least 2 students from a differing profession outside their school/department. The presenters will sign off on the IPE interprofessional interview form, showing that students interacted with them to learn more about other professions.

2. Interprofessional panel discussion: An interprofessional panel of faculty and SRW topic experts will discuss roles and responsibilities of their profession and how this relates to clinical and basic science research. Students will have the opportunity to ask panelists questions and learn more about collaborative research, teamwork, and roles/responsibilities.

3. Interprofessional case study: Students will participate in a small group discussion during a case study luncheon to address a topical case study relevant to the theme of SRW. They will discuss the case, report how their professions would address the case study, what they would do to resolve the issue at hand, and would then present these findings to the entire group. Faculty members will facilitate conversations to help students understand the roles of each profession and how the professions work in collaboration with each other. This will culminate in an open dialogue between students and faculty members from different schools and professions within TTUHSC to help all students better understand the roles of their counterparts. Learner outcomes of the interprofessional case student are: Students will gain a better understanding of other professions, how they would address a medically relevant issue, and how they would work together to resolve it.

Title

Emotional Intelligence in Healthcare Teams: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
Emotional intelligence (EI) has been an important topic in business and organizational leadership for decades. It’s equally important in the healthcare setting and among healthcare teams. It provides an understanding of a patient’s emotional reactions to a treatment, which leads to higher levels of patient satisfaction. Additionally, it leads to increased job satisfaction, and it also leads to improved leadership quality, which can result in better team effectiveness and motivation. During this interprofessional small group activity, teams of learners will be introduced to EI in teams and complete a series of team exercises around different domains of EI. Learners will also complete a case study and complete a facilitated debrief focusing on ways to enhance teamwork and collaboration by refining EI.

Learning Objectives:
Define the concept of Emotional Intelligence.
Solve interprofessional scenarios utilizing emotional intelligence elements.

Title

Abilene Interdisciplinary Symposium on Cancer & Biomedical Research: An Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
The Abilene Interdisciplinary Symposium on Cancer & Biomedical Research is designed to increase clinician, learner, and community knowledge in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of specific disease processes related to cancer. This event brings together world recognized scientists, undergraduate, and graduate students from TTUHSC, Abilene Christian University, Hardin-Simmons University, McMurry University, and Cisco College. Throughout this event, there will be opportunities for this interprofessional audience to learn about the new trends in cancer research, cancer immunotherapy, and novel aspects of immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer and other treatments. During the interactive poster session, students seeking credit for an IPE learning activity will have the opportunity to actively engage and interview other students, researchers, and clinicians regarding roles and responsibilities in biomedical research and collaborative care of cancer. Roles and Responsibilities to promote and advance the health of populations with cancer will be targeted as follows:

1. Students seeking an IPE learning activity will actively participate in the poster session during the Abilene Interdisciplinary Symposium on Cancer & Biomedical Research. Students will need to interview clinicians, researchers, and students from other disciplines regarding their roles and responsibilities in biomedical research and/or collaborative care of patient's with cancer.
2. Following the poster sessions, students will meet with a TTUHSC faculty or staff members and debrief what they learned during the interviews. Students will discuss roles and responsibilities and the impact those have on the health of populations with cancer. The debrief will also focus on how collaboration and learning roles and responsibilities of others on the healthcare team can improve patient outcomes.

The IPE learning objective for this IPE activity includes:

1. Students will be able to relate the roles and responsibilities of various health care professionals and biomedical researchers to promote and advance the health of populations with cancer.
2. Students will be able to discuss how collaboration and understanding roles and responsibilities of others on the healthcare team can improve patient outcomes in cancer.

Title

Anatomy and Physiology of Cleft Lip and Palate: An Interprofessional Small Group Discussion

Description
Research has established the effectiveness of interprofessional small group learning in health professions education as an active learning strategy that can enhance student collaboration, improve interprofessional communication skills, and facilitate deep processing of information. This interprofessional small group discussion centers around clinically oriented anatomy and physiology of cleft lip and palate. This IPE learning activity is integrated into a TTUHSC School of Medicine (SOM) course entitled "Patients, Physicians and Populations (P3)" that incorporates didactic material contained in the 8 blocks of the SOM Year 1 and 2 curriculum. This specific P3 event includes didactic material form the Clinically Oriented anatomy MS1 block.

Outline of activity:
1. This session will allow first year (MS1) medical students, undergraduate students from the speech, language, and hearing sciences program, graduate students from the speech-language pathology program, and graduate students from the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences to work collaboratively in small groups to describe and assess two topics pertinent to the anatomy of the head and neck: cleft palate and the vocal cords (also called vocal folds). Interprofessional teams of students are provided with resource reading materials prior to the small group discussion.
2. MS1 students are covering the anatomy of the head and neck in the Clinically Oriented Anatomy (COA) course, including the general areas below:
• Bones, muscles, arteries, nerves and lymph nodes of the neck
• Development of the nose, jaws and palate
• Embryological clinical considerations
• The larynx and vocal cords and their function in speech and respiration
3. This small group session has 2 main content areas: 1) Coping with Cleft Palate/ Cleft Lip, 2) Thyroplasty for Phonic Tics: An Ethical Case.
4. IPE is targeted during team formation and during small group discussions. IPE concepts targeted during this IPE activity include interprofessional communication, roles and responsibilities, and teamwork/collaborative care.
5. Students will have completed an online interprofessional education assessment prior to the session; they will be prompted to complete a post-test afterward.

Objectives:
• Identify interprofessional roles and responsibilities in dealing with patients and families affected by speech disorders
• Describe embryological anomalies to the head and neck, including cleft palate and cleft lip
• Identify key issues related to the diagnosis, treatment and long-term follow up for cleft palate
and cleft lip
• Analyze a recent case involving vocal cord surgery and discuss its clinical and ethical challenges related to collaborative team-based care

Title

Reflections on an Interprofessional Mini-Series: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
Interprofessional practice and education (IPE) is an important step in advancing health professional education and has been widely endorsed as a mechanism to improve the overall quality of health care. During this interprofessional small group activity, interprofessional teams of students will view one or more episodes from an interprofessional mini-series and then participate in a guided reflection of some aspect of collaborative practice. During the required small group reflection, students will have an opportunity to actively engage with other students in their small group. In some cases, pre- and post-tests will be provided to assess student engagement and learning after viewing episodes and participating in the guided reflections.

Currently, two interprofessional mini-series have been developed at Texas Tech Health Sciences Center. Each interprofessional mini-series promotes leadership and professional development in the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) “core” competency domains including (1) roles and responsibilities, (2) interprofessional communication, (3) values/ethics, and (4) teams and teamwork. The interprofessional mini-series serves to provide an IPE learning platform for students in preparation for collaborative care experiences on clinical rotation. The interprofessional mini-series includes high definition videos arranged in 12 individual learning episodes, as well as a single feature film. The 12 episodes depict both ideal and dramatized interprofessional and student/preceptor interactions, followed by educational commentary. Each episode is designed to include entertainment, student/preceptor scenarios, student/preceptor expert commentary, and student/preceptor learning pearls.

1. The Reason I Jump: An Interprofessional Mini-Series: This interprofessional mini-series includes the professions of occupational therapy, nursing, medicine, pharmacy, athletic training, emergency medical services, and speech-language pathology. The trailer for The Reason I Jump: An Interprofessional Mini-Series can be viewed at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdAUqjjzRLM.
2. Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series: This interprofessional mini-series includes the professions of nursing, pharmacy, medicine, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology. The trailer for Change of Heart: An Interprofessional Mini-Series can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1i79XDQHB4.

Title

Medication Safety: A Didactic Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
Medication errors are the second most prevalent cause of adverse patient incidents in health care settings. As such, medication safety is a global concern and interprofessional education is vital for preparing students, including nursing students, for their roles in the collaborative care team. Knowing about and valuing the skills and responsibilities of other team members and respecting each person’s unique contribution to the work of the team can lead to more effective communication and collaboration in the context of medication safety. The purpose of this interprofessional interview project is for nursing students to become familiar with other members of a patient's health care team, including pharmacists, and discover the current application of interprofessional teams in health care. Through an interprofessional interview with a pharmacist, Non-Traditional BSN students will better understand their professional roles and the roles of others around the central theme of medication safety and prevention of medication errors.

Students in the RN to BSN Program and Accelerated BSN Program (Second Degree and Veteran BSN (VBSN) tracks) are asked to interview a pharmacist in their community. The nursing student develops a set of content questions, as well as questions about role’s/responsibilities and team communication strategies around the central focus of medication safety, prevention of medication errors, and communication methods to encourage reporting of medication errors. The questions are used as a guide for the interview. Students are then asked to reflect upon the answers provided to them during the interview process and write a one-page interview reflection paper. Sample questions may include:

1. What other disciplines does the pharmacist interact with on a daily basis, i.e. physician, nurse, social worker, medical assistant, etc.?
2. How does the pharmacist interact with the other discipline(s)? Include no less than two examples.
3. What common medication errors are seen in the pharmacy?
4. What is the process for reporting a medication error?
5. What strategies are in place to prevent medication errors?
6. What kind of education is provided to clients regarding new medications?

Learning objectives for this interprofessional interview project include:
1. Reporting the collective and individual responsibilities in the prevention of medication errors.
2. Identify the importance of information (written and verbal) and communication with other professionals in the prevention and reporting of medication errors.
3. Recognize that teamwork and collaborative care are essential skills in medication safety and prevention of mediation errors.

Title

Collecting a Medical Case History in Patients Following a Stroke: An Interprofessional Patient Interview Project

Description
Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability globally, the effects of which may be prolonged with physical, cognitive, communicative, emotional, social, and financial consequences not only for those affected but also for their family and friends. Each year, over 5.7 million people die from stroke and it is the second leading cause of death worldwide (9.7% of all deaths). In the United States, the incidence of stroke is approximately 200 patients per 100,000 populations. Early management and rehabilitation after stroke requires an interprofessional approach by a coordinated team of healthcare professionals. Coordination among these professionals is imperative to improving the lives and outcomes of patients after a stroke. A number of characteristics have been assigned to successful interprofessional teams, including effective communication; mutual respect and understanding; trust; an appropriate combination of expertise and experience; a mutual goal orientation toward quality outcomes; efficient and effective resources; individual and group flexibility; clear purpose, role, and vision; leadership; a team culture; education and training opportunities; a positive presence; individual strengths; and value of the group work for the individual as well as the group as a whole (Clark, 2009; Molyneux, 2001; Nancarrow et al., 2013; Weaver, 2008). Individually and collectively, these characteristics are in alignment with successful interprofessional collaboration in stroke care, as Best Practice Guidelines for Stroke Rehabilitation advocate for quality interprofessional team approaches for community-based stroke rehabilitation (Allen, 2016; HSFO, 2013) The purpose of this IPE learning activity is to increase interprofessional collaboration around stroke care, improve interprofessional communication, improve team communication with patients with aphasia following stroke, foster respect, and enhance knowledge of the different roles each discipline plays on the health care team. During this activity, teams of medical and speech-language pathology students will conduct patient interviews and complete patient case history forms with a series of patients with aphasia following a stroke, or from some other neurologic etiology. According the National Aphasia Association, aphasia is an impairment of language, affecting the production or comprehension of speech and the ability to read or write. Aphasia is always due to injury to the brain-most commonly from a stroke, particularly in older individuals. This IPE learning activity is structured as follows: 1. Interprofessional brief: During the brief, faculty from the School of Medicine and the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences will meet with medical students and graduate speech-language pathology students to discuss student perceptions of stroke, aphasia, and team-based. Additionally, roles and responsibilities in stroke recovery, teamwork strategies, and values/ethics related to p

Title

Integration of Counseling to the Healthcare Community: A Didactic Interprofessional Interview Project

Description
The practice of professional counseling is collaborative and interprofessional at the core. Most counselors interact with allied service systems including healthcare professionals, educators, human service providers, and members of the criminal justice community on a regular basis. Much of this interaction is repeated within a small network of practitioners who have already developed strategic relationships between the agencies they represent. While individual relationships develop, the groundwork is often in place and practitioners struggle when having to develop strategic alliances with non-traditional partners.

Since this interprofessional learning opportunity is designed to occur as students begin their initial foray into professional practice settings, the opportunity will task them with developing a relationship with a member of another profession that would represent the potential to develop a non-traditional partnership for the population the individual hopes to serve.

This IPE learning activity will be a course assignment within the Practicum course for each of the three counseling programs: Clinical Mental Health Counseling (HPMC5314); Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling (HPCR5314) and Addictions Counseling (HPAC5314). Each of these programs is a fully on-line graduate training program to prepare fully licensable clinicians for practice in specialty counseling fields. As independent practitioners graduates will interact with a variety of allied professional fields in service to their clients.

During this experiential learning activity students will work with their clinical instructor to identify an allied professional field that may be of service to the population of clients the student desires to serve. Having identified a need, the student will be supported in making initial contacts within the field to arrange an interview for the purpose of ascertaining how they may be able to work together to serve clients in the future. To facilitate this process the students will develop an outline of the information they desire to learn, develop a list of interview questions that must include questions on roles and responsibilities, teams and teamwork, interprofessional communication, and values/ethics for collaborative practice. The students will then interview the professional and develop a reflective paper and ‘resource report’ to share with their peers regarding their learning experience. In the interview reflection, the students must report responses to interview questions and provide strategies to address improved collaboration and teamwork with the profession selected.

IPE learning objectives for this project include:

Values and Ethics for Interprofessional Practice
1. Review and compare the ethical practice standards for the student’s counseling specialty and the chosen profession.

Roles and Responsibilities
1. Explain the roles and responsibilities of other service providers and how the team works together to meet the client’s needs;
2. Forge interdependent relationships with other professions to improve care and advance learning.
3. Use the full scope of knowledge, skills, and abilities of available service providers to provide services that a safe, timely, efficient, effective and equitable.

Interprofessional Communication
1. Choose effective communication tools and techniques, including information systems and communication technologies, to facilitate discussions and interactions that enhance team function.

Team and Teamwork
1. Develops a teamwork approach to facilitate improved customer care.

Title

Dr. Ari Halldorsson Trauma and Critical Care Symposium: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
This activity is designed to encourage collaborative, multi-disciplinary healthcare for trauma patients. The symposium will educate healthcare professionals on the need to implement change to provide the most current and effective care for trauma-related injuries to have the best patient outcomes. Learners will be able to use available resources effectively when treating trauma/critically ill patients.

Following a morning of trauma-related panel discussions, presentations, and poster sessions, learners will gather for a tabletop small group discussion over lunch. Interprofessional teams of learners will participate in facilitated discussions on teamwork, interprofessional communication tools, roles/responsibilities, and values/ethics of patient-centered trauma care. Learners will reflect on "aha" moments from the symposium and how they can grow their skills in evidence-based collaborative practice and team leadership in trauma care.

Symposium Learning Objectives:
1. Describe each trauma verification level.
2. Characterize the role of communication between healthcare providers along the continuum of care to improve patient outcomes.
3. Identify the unique aspects of caring for injured patients in rural areas.
4. Describe appropriate and timely consultation and/or referral in the trauma acute care surgery populations.
5. Describe and discuss the initial evaluation and treatment of inhalation injuries.
6. Discuss confounding variables/elements during goals of care discussions.
7. Develop conceptual strategies incorporating damage control principles to minimize morbidity and mortality after severe injury.
8. Identify potential trauma patients that are candidates for ECMO.
9. Identify, anticipate, and plan for children with a difficult airway.
10. Develop a safe and effective plan for the management of the pediatric airway.

IPE Learning Objectives:
1. Learners will actively engage in tabletop discussions and share insights into the importance of teamwork and interprofessional dynamics in achieving optimal patient outcomes for trauma-related injuries.
2. Through guided small group discussions, attendees will identify key values and ethics in trauma care, recognize patient-centered approaches, and formulate action plans to integrate these principles into their respective roles.
3. Learners will reflect on their "aha" moments and develop strategies for fostering evidence-based collaborative practice and leadership within their interprofessional trauma care teams.

Title

Pulmonary Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology: An Interprofessional Gross Anatomy Lab and Case Study

Description
Healthcare provision and education have become increasingly collaborative and patient-centered, where interprofessional teams come together to learn together and to provide patients with the best-integrated health services. This is particularly important for patients with complex and/or chronic health conditions, which are best addressed by a collaborative team of healthcare professionals including physicians and pharmacists. Management of diseases and medications is improved when physicians and pharmacists work as a team to diagnose, prescribe, supply, and counsel on the use of medications. Additionally, healthcare students who purposefully learn and practice the foundations of interprofessional practice including roles/responsibilities, teams/teamwork, interprofessional communication, and values/ethics will be more prepared to intentionally and effectively work together to improve patient outcomes and the current healthcare system.

In this interprofessional gross anatomy lab and case-based learning activity, interprofessional small groups of 10 students from medicine and pharmacy will participate in an anatomy lab on the pulmonary structures, physiology, systems integration, and pathology, as well as complete an associated case study on a patient with COPD to reinforce anatomy concepts. Following the case study, small groups will be led through a team debrief with a faculty facilitator to discuss the lab and case, as well as reinforce IPE concepts. A panel discussion with physician/pharmacist dyads will also discuss current trends in collaborative care. The IPE aim of this activity is to foster collaborative teamwork within an atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation. Students are encouraged and cued to approach each other without bias and learn about, from, and with each other. By working as an interprofessional collaborative team, students discuss roles and responsibilities within in collaborative care teams. Students will also discuss IPE core competencies during the formal team debrief.

Learning objectives for this activity include:

1. Review a pulmonary dissection through collaborative teamwork.
2. Work collaboratively on a team with other healthcare professionals to solve a case related to a chronic pulmonary disorder or disease process.
3. Define IPE and the four competencies of IPE.
4. Identify something newly learned from and about each other and their program/future profession.
5. Explain importance of interprofessional collaboration in patient safety.

Title

The Nurse Executive’s Role in Leading Improvement: An Interprofessional Didactic and Experiential Project

Description
Purpose: The purpose of the Interprofessional Education (IPE) activity is to provide an in situ clinical experience in which the graduate student in the nurse administration program enacts the role of a nurse executive and leads a team of interprofessional healthcare professionals (that includes at least one person from a from a different profession, i.e., physician, social worker, respiratory therapist, occupational therapist, physical therapist, pharmacist, etc...) in an improvement initiative (nurse administration project [NA Project]).

Detailed Description: In a prerequisite course, NURS5448, Administrative Role Development: The Nurse Administrator as Leader, students work directly with faculty and a preceptor(s) to develop and implement the clinical experience. In preparation for leading change in an interprofessional environment, the students learn skills related to the nurse executive role as well as other profession’s leadership skills. The core competencies used to build leadership skills for nurses are the Nurse Manager and Nurse Executive Core Competencies developed by the American of Nurse Leaders (AONL), and for the other professions, the Healthcare Leadership Alliance (HLA) Core Competency Directory is utilized. Students use the core competencies to measure the status of their leadership skills by reflecting on their clinical experience via a clinical log. During clinical, students spend time with leaders within the organization, mostly non-nurse leaders i.e. financial vice presidents, billing personnel, quality improvement directors, pharmacy as well as ancillary department leaders. This helps students attain skills from recognized clinical experts and facilitates interprofessional relationships needed to create sustainable change and provide safe high-quality care in the clinical setting. A deliverable at the end of the didactic portion of this class is a written proposal for an improvement project, NA Project. Development of the proposal requires students to work with the preceptor as well as appropriate interprofessional(s) to identify and plan the project. The level of engagement of other interprofessionals will vary based on the NA Project and the clinical site, but at the very least includes the student interviewing non-nursing professionals to ensure multiple professional perspectives influence the improvement project. At the end of the course, students are required to have a NA Project that has been approved by either the site or TTUHSC’s QIRB or IRB and is ready to implement in the next class, or NUR6410: Application of the Administrative Practice.

Title

Speech-Language Pathology/Occupational Therapy Co-Treatment: An Interprofessional Collaborative Care Experience

Description
A collaborative care approach between speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and occupational therapists (OTs) is a highly effective treatment strategy. Due to the integration of sensory and motor abilities into the development of speech, language, cognitive, and swallowing skills, a natural connection between OTs and SLPs exists. Additionally, both have a common foundation of practice and students from each profession are trained in anatomy, physiology, neurology, illnesses/disease processes, and medical management of disorders. OT practice often prioritizes self-care, work, play, psychosocial function, motor skills, sensory integration, and related functional issues that impact participation in daily activities. SLPs prioritize functions of communication, cognitive ability, oral motor skills, and swallowing ability that allow individuals to participate in daily activities.

The purpose of this interprofessional collaborative care experience is to encourage OT and SLP students to explore common ground, work collaboratively with each other to develop a patient/family centered plan of care and to execute a course of treatment. A collaborative session between disciplines, or co-treatment, allows students from both professions to use their professional skills to address complimentary components of skill development. Successful collaboration allows the patient to also generalize the skills taught within the therapy session into their home, classroom, or daily life. During this collaborative care experience SLP/OT pairs will work together in the TTUHSC Speech, Language and Hearing Clinic to deliver group or individual therapy to children and adults with a variety of speech, language, cognitive, sensory, and/or swallowing impairments. Co-treatment with an OT and SLP student during the regular semesters (fall and spring) is typically 1-3x per week for 12-13 weeks. Co-Treatment in the summer semester typically takes the form of intensive summer therapy programs with daily treatment for 1-2 weeks. Through this type of collaborative care experience, the patient’s outcomes are more easily reached, and skills typically carryover/generalize more quickly so length of treatment is much shorter. This collaborative care experiential learning experience also allows students to gain excitement and enthusiasm about using common underlying principles to enhance treatment outcomes.

Principles of IPE and collaborative care are address in the following ways:
• Role clarification
• Collaborative treatment planning
• Continuity of care
• Shared vocabulary
• Complementary targets
• Behavior management strategies
• Communication with parents/caregivers

Title

Emergency Preparedness in Communities (EPIC) Day: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
Various national guidelines and accreditation standards stress the importance of teaching health care professionals interprofessional education (IPE) within a population health framework. Providing an opportunity for students from clinical, research, and population health programs to learn from, with, and about each other will foster improved understanding of public health and patient safety concepts within social determinants of health and interprofessional collaboration contexts. Emergency Preparedness in Communities (EPIC) Day is designed to foster improvement in interprofessional communication and teamwork skills within a public health emergency framework with an emphasis on community resources, policy, action planning, and population health. Interprofessional teams of ~10 learners will participate in population and public health cases and small group activities with a faculty facilitator. Teams will complete the following IPE activities.

Communication and Teamwork Skill Builder & Debrief
Public Health Emergency Activity Pt 1 - Action Planning
Public Health Emergency Activity Pt 2 - Team Presentations
Debrief & Post-Assessment

Public health learning objectives:
Describe how public health emergencies impact population health outcomes.
List environmental and public health risks associated with public health emergencies.
Generate a list of ways in which health professionals can communicate and collaborate to contribute to preparedness, response, and recovery from public health emergencies.
Critically analyze team-based action plans for clinical, research, and public health professionals in public health emergencies.

Primary IPE learning objectives:
VE01. Promote the values and interests of persons and populations in health care delivery, One Health, and population health initiatives.
C04. Promote common understanding of shared goals.
RR04. Differentiate each team member’s role, scope of practice, and responsibility in promoting health outcomes.
TT03. Practice team reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making.
TT06. Reflect on self and team performance to inform and improve team effectiveness.

Title

Interprofessional Professionalism in Healthcare: An Interprofessional Small Group Activity

Description
Healthcare involves many personal interactions with a variety of people. Interprofessional professionalism in healthcare is more than just good manners; it is about establishing respectable relationships with patients, team members, and managers. Interprofessional professionalism (IPP) is defined as consistent demonstration of core values evidenced by professionals working together, aspiring to and wisely applying principles of, altruism and caring, excellence, ethics, respect, communication, and accountability to achieve optimal health and wellness in individuals and communities. (Stern DT. Measuring Medical Professionalism. Oxford University Press. New York, NY; 2006:19.) In a healthcare setting, healthcare professionals must set the tone for the interaction with patients, families, and other members of the healthcare team. Additionally, health professionals are constantly in contact with people who will assess them based on the way they communicate, body language, and appearance. Interprofessional professionalism, when practiced by all health professions: enhances quality healthcare outcomes for patients, promotes a culture that value and foster individual competence, and improves practice and academic environments. The purpose of this IPE learning activity is to focus on the observable behaviors that illustrate what interprofessional professionalism looks like in the context of interprofessional collaborations focused on patient- and family-centered care. Key IPP concepts will include understanding one’s own profession, understanding professional boundaries, evidence of respect towards other professions and valuing their contribution, understanding legal and ethical requirements of professions in team, reflection and critically appraisal and evaluation of outcomes of practice.

During an interprofessional etiquette dinner hosted by the TTUHSC School of Health Professions, IPP will be addressed by a guest speaker, interprofessional networking, small group discussions with IPP topics facilitated by a faculty preceptor, and student development and presentation of elevator speeches. Students will be divided into interprofessional small groups and assigned a table and preceptor. Following a presentation on IPP, students will partake of a three-course etiquette dinner. Throughout the dinner, the preceptor will facilitate small group discussions from a list of predetermined IPP topics. Students will then have the opportunity to develop and deliver an “elevator speech.” The interprofessional small group and faculty will comment on the delivery and the content, as well as provide suggestions for improving interprofessional communication style.
IPP learning outcomes for this IPE Learning activity include:

COMMUNICATION
Demonstrates active listening with members of other health professions.
Communicates respectfully with members of other health professions.
Communicates with members of other health professions in a way they can understand, without using profession-specific jargon.
Responds to questions posed by members of other health professions in a manner that meets the needs of the requester.

RESPECT
Demonstrates confidence, without arrogance, while working with members of other health professions.
Recognizes that other health professions may have their distinct cultures and values, and shows respect for these.
Respects the contributions and expertise of members of other health professions.
Seeks to understand the roles and responsibilities of members of other health professions as related to care.
Determines patient care roles and responsibilities in a respectful manner with members of other health professions.

ALTRUISM AND CARING
Offers to help members of other health professions when caring for patients.
Demonstrates empathy for members of other health professions.
Models for other health professionals compassion towards patients/clients, families and caregivers.
Places patient/client needs above own needs and those of other health professionals.

EXCELLENCE
Coordinates with other health professions and the patient/client, family and caregivers to produce an optimal plan of care.
Reviews all relevant documentation from other health care professions prior to making recommendations to plan of care.
Contributes to decisions about patient care regardless of hierarchy/profession-based boundaries.
Works with members of other health professions to assure continuity of care for patients.

ETHICS
Interacts with members of other health professions in an honest and trustworthy manner.
Works collaboratively with members of other health professions to resolve conflicts that arise in the context of caring for patients/clients.
Discusses with members of other health professions any ethical implications of healthcare decisions.
Reports or addresses unprofessional and unethical behaviors when working with members of other health professions.

ACCOUNTABILITY
Engages with members of other health professions in quality assurance/improvement activities.
Seeks clarification from members of other health professions about unclear information.
Accepts consequences for his or her actions without redirecting blame to members of other health professions.
Works with members of other health professions to identify and address errors and potential errors in the delivery of care.